NASA sees troublesome remnants of Cyclone Oswald still causing problems

January 26, 2013
NASA sees troublesome remnants of Cyclone Oswald still causing problems
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Oswald's remnants on Jan. 25 at 1458 UTC (9:58 a.m. ES/U.S.) as it hugged the southeastern coast of Queensland, dumping heavy rainfall. Credit: NRL/NASA

Ex-tropical cyclone Oswald doesn't know when to stop causing problems for Queensland, Australia, and now teamed up with a low pressure area, it continues to bring heavy rainfall. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the remnants and saw Oswald hugging the southeastern Queensland coast.

Oswald has dropped a lot of rainfall throughout Queensland. An earlier using NASA's data showed Oswald and its remnants had dropped over 600 mm (~23.6 inches) of rain in areas of the Cape York Peninsula near the Gulf of Carpentaria. Higher rainfall totals have been recorded over the southern Capricornia district.

On Saturday, Jan. 26 at 4 a.m. Queensland local time (or 3 p.m. EST/U.S. on Jan. 25) ex-Tropical Cyclone Oswald was located over land in Queensland, Australia, about 55 nautical miles (63 miles/ 102 km) northeast of Emerald and 85 nautical miles (97.8 miles/ 157.4 km) west northwest of Rockhampton. Oswald and a trough of low pressure are bringing heavy rainfall to eastern Queensland. The trough, an elongated area of low pressure, stretches from the southern Gulf of Carpentaria to ex-Tropical Cyclone Oswald and over to the southern Capricornia coast. Ex-Tropical Cyclone Oswald and the trough are expected to continue moving southwards over the next few days.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Oswald's remnants on Jan. 25 at 1458 UTC (9:58 a.m. ES/U.S.) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard captured an of the storm. At the time, Oswald's were near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph), and minimum central pressure was near 995 millibars. At the time Aqua passed over some of the strongest storms and heaviest rainfall appeared west and east of Yeppoon and over Hervey Bay.

As Oswald's remnants continue to hug the eastern Queensland coast, residents can expect gusty winds, rough seas, heavy rainfall, and possible flash flooding.

There are gale warnings in effect over many areas, including: St. Lawrence to Burnett Head; Burnett Heads to Double Island Point, including Hervey Bay; Double Island Point to Point Danger, including Moreton Bay; and Bowen to St. Lawrence.

According to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABM), on Jan. 25 at 2 p.m. EST, the heaviest rainfall was occurring over the southern Capricornia district. ABM noted that in excess of 27.5 inches (700 mm) in less than 2 days, leading to rapid river and stream rises in the area.

Explore further: NASA's TRMM satellite measures flooding rains from Australia monsoon

More information: For updates on Oswald's remnants, visit: www.bom.gov.au/australia/warnings/index.shtml

Related Stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Jasmine near Tonga

February 14, 2012

Tropical Cyclone Jasmine is still lingering near the island nation of Tonga in the South Pacific and was captured in an infrared image from NASA's Aqua satellite. Jasmine is bringing gusty winds and heavy rainfall to some ...

NASA sees remnants of Tropical Storm Oswald still strong

January 24, 2013

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that a band of thunderstorms on the eastern side of Tropical Storm Oswald's remnants still contained some punch. Oswald's remnants have triggered severe weather warnings ...

Recommended for you

What would a tsunami in the Mediterranean look like?

August 27, 2015

A team of European researchers have developed a model to simulate the impact of tsunamis generated by earthquakes and applied it to the Eastern Mediterranean. The results show how tsunami waves could hit and inundate coastal ...

Intensity of desert storms may affect ocean phytoplankton

August 27, 2015

Each spring, powerful dust storms in the deserts of Mongolia and northern China send thick clouds of particles into the atmosphere. Eastward winds sweep these particles as far as the Pacific, where dust ultimately settles ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Sherrin
not rated yet Jan 28, 2013
This has been a super storm, causing immense flooding along the entire Queensland coast (how many 1,000s of kilometres is that?) - and it's not over yet. The system is still tracking southward along the east coast. Newcastle and Sydney are now being lashed with heavy rain and winds. The rain has also reached Canberra.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.