Kickstarter project team claims its LED bulb world's most efficient

Jan 18, 2013 by Bob Yirka report

(Phys.org)—Entrepreneurs Christian Yan, Tom Rodinger and Gimmy Chu have formed a partnership and created a company they call NanoLight. Their products are LED light bulbs that the group claims are the world's most efficient. They are currently looking for backing on Kickstarter, the crowd funding site.

As most everyone is aware, traditional incandescent light bulbs are on their way out – they waste far too much energy. Instead, consumers have been urged to purchase Compact Florescent Lamps (CFLs), a smaller variant of the long thin light bulbs used in . Unfortunately, thus far, consumers have been less than impressed with the bulbs, both with the quality of the light they emit and the time lag between when they are turned on and when they achieve their maximum brightness. Because of that, research efforts have blossomed aimed at coming up with a new kind of bulb that can offer light quality as good as the old, but with far better . Most of that research has been focused on bulbs, which are now available to consumers, but at high cost and with ungainly metal heat sinks.

The trio at NanoLight have come up with a unique way to deal with the heat that is produced when using strong LED's, they've physically connected them to small circuit boards which dissipate the heat. The circuit boards are then cut to fit together, like a 3D jigsaw puzzle, to form a rough facsimile of an incandescent light bulb. Using this design, the team is offering three different types of bulbs.

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The first is listed as using 10 watts of power to produce what they say is the equivalent light output of a 75 watt incandescent bulb. The second consumes 12 and is claimed to produce the same light output as a 100 watt . The third option is apparently the same as the second except it produces more light. Because of heat sink issues, most large makers of LED bulbs aren't offering bulbs that are supposed to be comparable to a 100 watt incandescent bulb, which might be a good selling point for the bulbs from NanoLight. Another selling point is the arrangement of the LEDs on the bulb – they allow for throwing all over a room instead of in just one direction, as is the case with most current commercial options.

The team has received pledges far in excess of their goal, so it looks like these new bulbs will soon make their way into homes where they will no doubt prove, or disprove the claims of their makers.

Explore further: Going nuts? Turkey looks to pistachios to heat new eco-city

More information: www.thenanolight.com/ and www.kickstarter.com/projects/619878070/nanolight-the-worlds-most-energy-efficient-lightbu

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User comments : 11

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muggins
5 / 5 (2) Jan 18, 2013
Pretty good, but I'd want a warm colour instead of white light which may lower the lumens/watt slightly.
Eikka
2 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2013
4000 K is a little too much on the blue side in regular room lighting, despite the chart that shows it's yellow. Even 3000K looks harsh when you have a single bulb lighting the room because the color balance changes with the amount of light. The human eye gets less and less sensitive to red and yellow when the amount of light drops.

Of course you get used to everything. Wear pink glasses and in a week it feels just normal.
dschlink
1 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2013
The physics is rather simple, spread the LEDs out over larger heatsinks and you can run them hotter.
Modernmystic
not rated yet Jan 18, 2013
Of course you get used to everything. Wear pink glasses and in a week it feels just normal.


I've been around florescent bulbs my entire life and I've learned to tolerate them, but they never "feel normal"....

LEDs are going to need a face lift in their spectrum if they're ever going to be comfortable for most people. It's simple biology.
Tektrix
5 / 5 (2) Jan 18, 2013
The biggest white color problem is the lack of a continuous spectrum. The radiated spectrum from LEDs is a few peaks at most. It's almost impossible to filter white LED light to tune the color temperature because there is relatively little to filter. Reflected white LED light is unnatural looking because of the way materials absorb different wavelengths. Due to the spikes in the radiated spectrum, reflected light will show artifacts of color absorption by surrounding materials, often becoming bluer. Achieving continuous spectra with LEDs is a tough problem however. Other technologies- organics in particular- can produce a continuum (or near to one) and therefore are potentially able to become a much more pleasing illuminant.
Venocia
not rated yet Jan 18, 2013
The biggest white color problem is the lack of a continuous spectrum. It's almost impossible to filter white LED light to tune the color temperature because there is relatively little to filter.


In response to this & other comments on the color, wouldn't this be easily fixed by employing QDVisions QLED tech? Their quantum-dot formula allows for low-power, finely-tunable, pure color generation/filtering. It addresses the issue of unnatural LED lighting; so perhaps it could be combined with the 'nanolight' for optimal natural lighting & lm/w?
Skepticus
1 / 5 (2) Jan 19, 2013
A peer-reviewed global study of consumers' reactions to the light quality of LEDs and CFLs is needed to prove the complaints of the Edison-screwed Americans once and for all. It is a mystery, as everyone else are happy and going all out to ditch these oil wasters. So far, they haven't getting more mentally disturbed, going epileptic nor getting eye problems. Must be something in the voltage and frequency used in the States.
phlox1
not rated yet Jan 19, 2013
(numerical values are in the last video)
214V and 0.1A gives about 21V*A apparent power. The power factor of 0.57 means that about 21VA enters the bulb, 12 are used to power the LEDs but the rest will return each period in the grid as reactive power (and I see a big capacitor in the bulb, which makes me believe that the reactive power is capacitive - the worst that could be). Energy distributors doesn't like reactive power and for good reasons.
The very small power factor of this lamp denotes the cheaper schematic used to power-up the LEDs, the classical chinese way of doing things. And they show you only the active power, when the total power used by the bulb is roughly double.
CapitalismPrevails
1 / 5 (2) Jan 19, 2013
Will the light be ambient and will it cost less per lum than other LEDS, CFLs, and incandescents.
Eikka
not rated yet Jan 20, 2013
. And they show you only the active power, when the total power used by the bulb is roughly double.


True, but the bulb doesn't technically need to draw more power than its active power. The reactive power that reflects back into the grid can be eliminated with a better ballast design.

Which will make the bulb more expensive, but hey, no free lunch.

A peer-reviewed global study of consumers' reactions to the light quality of LEDs and CFLs is needed to prove the complaints of the Edison-screwed Americans once and for all.


The question becomes, what are the metrics?

If you ask people "does this light seem white to you?", you'll hardly get an answer because it is difficult to estimate. The effects are subtle.

With a lamp of poor CRI, the main effect is the difficulty of distinguishing colors apart on the illuminated objects. Colors that are close together start to look alike, and everything kinda muddles together. But to clearly see the effect you need a color chart.
Sean Houlihane
not rated yet Jan 27, 2013
I am extremely sceptical about what is being claimed here. Why should anyone believe that this bulb is efficient, with a well designed power supply and with good thermal characteristics?
I am under the impression that all of the big lighting companies are investing in designs to meet similar criteria, this project shouldn't need kickstarter to make the designers lots of money if they have any genuine IP here. The first led bulb of this type of form factor I bought lasted 2 weeks. No warranty on kickstarter..

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