Kaspersky finds 'Red October' virus targeting E. Europe

Jan 14, 2013
Employees of anti-virus program developer Kaspersky Lab work at their company's offices in Moscow on March 10, 2011. Kaspersky Lab said Monday it had identified a new computer virus it dubbed "Red October" targeting eastern European countries that appeared to be collecting classified files using NATO and EU encryption.

Kaspersky Lab said Monday it had identified a new computer virus it dubbed "Red October" targeting eastern European countries that appeared to be collecting classified files using NATO and EU encryption.

"The primary focus of this campaign targets countries in Eastern Europe, former USSR Republics, and countries in Central Asia, although victims can be found everywhere, including and North America," said the maker of anti-virus software in a statement.

Kaspersky Lab said "there is strong technical evidence to indicate the attackers have Russian-speaking origins."

Red October, which has been active since at least 2007, appears to collect files encrypted with software used by several entities from the European Union to NATO, it added.

Kaspersky said Red October also infected smartphones and collected login information to test on other systems.

Red October has what Kaspersky Lab called a unique "resurrection" module that hid in and programmes that allowed the attackers to regain access if the virus was discovered and removed.

In addition to diplomatic and governmental agencies of various countries across the world, Red October also targeted , energy and nuclear groups, and trade and aerospace targets, added Kaspersky Lab.

Founded in 1997, Kaspersky Lab employs more than 2,300 specialists and is a leading IT security and anti-virus software company.

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