Irish newspapers on defence over sharing links

Jan 04, 2013
The body representing Ireland's leading newspapers was forced to defend the way it enforces copyright law on Friday after revelations that it charges websites that link to its articles.

The body representing Ireland's leading newspapers was forced to defend the way it enforces copyright law on Friday after revelations that it charges websites that link to its articles.

National Newspapers of Ireland (NNI), which represents 16 of the most popular national papers, said it believed "that the display and transmission of links does constitute an infringement of copyright" under current Irish law.

However, it insisted that "there is a distinction between the sending and receipt of links for personal use on the one hand and the sending and of links for commercial purposes on the other".

"NNI and its members never have had any difficulty with people displaying links for personal use," it said in a statement.

The row was sparked by the revelation that Women's Aid, a charity combatting , had been told by an NNI subsidiary that it must pay 300 euros ($400) to display up to five links to newspaper articles on its website.

The fees relate to hypertext links to the original article on a newspaper's website, not a reproduction of the text—either totally or partially.

The case was highlighted by Dublin-based solicitor for Women's Aid, Simon McGarr, in a blog entry on Sunday entitled, "2012: The year Irish newspapers tried to destroy the web."

He said NNI sub-company Newspaper Licensing Ireland Limited (NLI) told Women's Aid that the rates increased to 1,350 euros for displaying 26 to 50 , while the cost for 50 or more was "negotiable".

Explore further: Lions Gate partners with online outfit RocketJump

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Belgian newspaper: Google blocking us on searches

Jul 15, 2011

(AP) -- At least three Belgian newspapers are reporting Google is preventing their web sites from being found through its search engine as part of a legal fight accusing the American-based company of copyright infringement.

AP to take on Web piracy, cut rates

Apr 06, 2009

The US news agency the Associated Press announced plans on Monday to take legal action against websites that publish stories from the AP or its member newspapers without permission.

Singapore's SPH sues Yahoo! in copyright row

Nov 23, 2011

Asian media group Singapore Press Holdings is suing Yahoo! for copyright infringement, accusing the US Internet giant of reproducing its news items without permission.

Dutch court orders Pirate Bay to remove links

Oct 22, 2009

A Dutch court Thursday ordered Sweden's The Pirate Bay filesharing website to remove links to works of members of a Netherlands-based music and film copyright protection group.

Google: Belgian papers to appear in searches again

Jul 18, 2011

(AP) -- Google began allowing the Web sites of French-language Belgian newspapers to appear in its search results again on Monday, saying it had obtained the papers' legal consent to do so without repercussions.

Recommended for you

Instagram photo-sharing service goes down

Apr 12, 2014

Popular photo-sharing site Instagram was not working Saturday, as frustrated users quickly turned to social network Twitter and other web sites to share their complaints.

Authors Guild asks US court to rule against Google

Apr 11, 2014

The Authors Guild says that Google Inc. is stealing business from retailers and has asked a New York federal appeals court to find that the Internet giant is violating copyright laws with its massive book digitization project.

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
5 / 5 (3) Jan 05, 2013
I'm not inclined to be charitable towards these newspapers. I don't think many are. They chose to make their content available on the web. They can always rescind that decision.

I don't know where the situation with newspapers and the internet is going to end up, but this sort of legislation, merely providing life support for newspapers, isn't useful in the long run.
ValeriaT
5 / 5 (1) Jan 05, 2013
Many people still apparently didn't understand, what they putting on the Internet is free for sharing by definition. If they don't want it to be free, they shouldn't put it on the Internet.
omatwankr
2.3 / 5 (3) Jan 05, 2013
This sounds like a job for anonymous
mrlewish
not rated yet Jan 07, 2013
Simple solution. Stop linking to the newspaper. See how their ad revenue does.

More news stories

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.

Making 'bucky-balls' in spin-out's sights

(Phys.org) —A new Oxford spin-out firm is targeting the difficult challenge of manufacturing fullerenes, known as 'bucky-balls' because of their spherical shape, a type of carbon nanomaterial which, like ...

Gene removal could have implications beyond plant science

(Phys.org) —For thousands of years humans have been tinkering with plant genetics, even when they didn't realize that is what they were doing, in an effort to make stronger, healthier crops that endured climates better, ...