Euclid Zero debuts to capture in-store shopper behavior

Jan 12, 2013 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org)—A Palo Alto-based retail analytics company this week introduced a no-hardware solution for retailers seeking store traffic data on customers. The solution works simply by monitoring people's mobile devices. The company is Euclid and the new product is Euclid Zero, designed to pick up unique mobile device IDs on smartphones when they recognize a store's Wi-Fi network. Euclid Zero will give retailers, malls, and other venues the ability to measure in-store behavior.

To ensure privacy, Euclid provides aggregated, anonymous information and also emphasizes that anyone can opt out. Euclid contractually requires its retail customers wanting to use Euclid analytics to provide notice at the store according to the company CEO, Will Smith. Shoppers are offered to learn more or opt out, and they can scan the or follow the link.

would note the word Zero in the new Euclid Zero, as there is no required investment in hardware installations in order to gather customer traffic metrics.

With Euclid Zero, retailers can now use their own to obtain the analytics from shoppers with Wi-Fi enabled smartphones.

When Euclid launched its first product over a year ago, retailers had to install some hardware, an Internet enabled device used to monitor the WiFi signals from shoppers' smartphones. That was transformed into data in the cloud and used for aggregating metrics delivered back to retailers. Now, the basic data collection process is the same but Euclid Zero removes the requirement of installing the extra box. A 's IT manager can just enter the WiFi control panel and turn on Euclid functionality. The same data once collected through the sensor can be collected using the WiFi access points already in the store. "Retailers can use metrics like Engagement Rate, Visit Duration and Visit Frequency to optimize the performance of their marketing, merchandising and operations," said the publicity release.

The ability of the company to deliver analytics in the retail industry is, by the numbers reported from Euclid, indicative of a great interest by the so-called brick and mortar stores to capture the breadth of customer information that can help them succeed. Euclid launched in November 2011 to help brick and mortar retailers use the level of analytics that could enable them to compete more effectively with online competition. From early retail adopters in the San Francisco area, Euclid said it today has national clients using its software, including retailers in the top 100.

Euclid Zero is being offered in partnership with a number of wireless access point providers. The providers include Aerohive Networks, Aruba Networks, Fortinet, and Xirrus.

Euclid Zero will be shown January 14 and 15 at the National Retail Foundation's BIG Show in New York City.

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More information: euclidanalytics.com/

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User comments : 10

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Telekinetic
2.7 / 5 (7) Jan 12, 2013
I'm as far left of libertarian as one could get and also opposed to violence as a means of making social or political statements, but in the case of this kind of electronic eavesdropping one begins to wonder if the fears of the nut Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, had some merit. Law enforcement agencies won't need your consent or court order one day, if not already, to track you by your smartphone, which is worrisome because it's wide open for abuse. It also makes me nauseous to think that we're just consumer lemmings whose behavior patterns are for sale. Then again, if I spend anytime on this computer, someone's collecting and selling that information anyway. A cabin in the woods, hmmm.
dogbert
3 / 5 (6) Jan 12, 2013
Apparently, this system requires that the shopper have WiFi turned on in their phone.

Since WiFi drains the battery when it is not used, won't most shoppers have WiFi turned off? I keep mine turned off when I am away from my WiFi sites.

I suppose you can get useful information tracking only part of the subject group.
Howard_Vickridge
3.7 / 5 (3) Jan 13, 2013
Enough depersonalisation, already. This is why i like farmers markets, craft markets, and the local shops. They care because they actually know you, and they use human wetware instead of corporate software.
alfie_null
3 / 5 (2) Jan 13, 2013
Seems like every other day I read of yet another (electronic) technique someone's developed for gathering and measuring shoppers' preferences. It makes me wonder if prospective clients of these systems are able to effectively use the information gathered. I think that outside the largest retailers, not likely.

Marketing is, in my jaded view, convincing people to spend money on something they otherwise wouldn't have. Getting people to spend money on something they don't really need by telling untruths, appealing to irrational aspects.

In that, promoting these information gathering device and techniques is no different. This is marketing to people who want to market - convincing them that they _really_ _need_ this gadget.
Mayday
1 / 5 (1) Jan 13, 2013
This system just does what the old store clerks did in the old days, but potentially better. It "minds the store" with an extra layer of tracking. Howie longs for the merchants who actually got to know their customers. In most retail establishments today, the staff isn't capable of minding much at all, beyond their cuticles. I think this is a useful technology with the potential to make the retail experience more efficient and productive for the shopper. Most retail environments are disorganized and unnavigable. Maybe this will bring some order so we can find what we need and get gone.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.8 / 5 (5) Jan 13, 2013
Hi tk
because it's wide open for abuse. It also makes me nauseous to think that we're just consumer lemmings whose behavior patterns are for sale.
You are a lemming. You have always been a lemming whether you know it or not. You only get to choose from the alternatives you are given, and you are told beforehand which ones you prefer.

Tk is the kind of guy who would have cops chase down speeders and risk accidents doing so, just because speedcams are so 'unethical'. He would have cops in unmarked cars following people all over the place rather than tracking them with a GPS device because, you know, big brother would have loved GPS.

I'm just guessing here. How'd I do?

In the future crime WILL be impossible despite freedumb lovers like
This system just does what the old store clerks did in the old days, but potentially better. It "minds the store" with an extra layer of tracking.
Naw it's 'unethical' don't you see?? Machines will never own us. We have 'souls' after all.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1.8 / 5 (5) Jan 13, 2013
'In the future crime WILL be impossible despite freedumb lovers like tk.'

-Soon enough we will even have spellcheck that doesn't drop words when you're not looking.
PoppaJ
1 / 5 (3) Jan 13, 2013
Another way to track and target. Doesn't matter that we don't want to be tracked and targeted. It doesn't matter that it violates our privacy. It doesn't matter because corporations are allowed to train us. Like dogs and biscuits. Turn off your cellphone and they are stopped.
Telekinetic
1 / 5 (2) Jan 13, 2013
Hi tk
because it's wide open for abuse. It also makes me nauseous to think that we're just consumer lemmings whose behavior patterns are for sale.
You are a lemming. You have always been a lemming whether you know it or not. You only get to choose from the alternatives you are given, and you are told beforehand which ones you prefer.
-TheGhostofOtto1923

The "Matrix" is just a movie.
Telekinetic
1 / 5 (2) Jan 13, 2013
'In the future crime WILL be impossible despite freedumb lovers like tk.'

-Soon enough we will even have spellcheck that doesn't drop words when you're not looking.

Knowing that you're of the generation that lived through the 1960's, you'd remember that the right to privacy was paramount, and that news of government prying was apt to cause a hurricane of protest. If you can't remember Watergate, then either it's your anti-depressants or you've always aligned yourself with "Nationalsozialismus." I'm just guessing here- How'd I do?

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