EU raps Daimler over new coolant rules

Jan 11, 2013
The EU cautioned German auto giant Daimler it must upgrade the air conditioning coolant used in its new models to meet greenhouse gas emission targets if they are to be cleared for sale.

The EU cautioned German auto giant Daimler Friday it must upgrade the air conditioning coolant used in its new models to meet greenhouse gas emission targets if they are to be cleared for sale.

"If Daimler does not meet this requirement, its new models cannot be approved," the office of European Union Industry Commissioner Antonio Tajani said.

New rules require EU automakers to use a new, less environmentally harmful gas in their air conditioning systems so as to curb , widely blamed for contributing to global warming.

"The European Commission must ensure that this legislation is respected," Tadani spokesman Carlo Corraza told AFP.

"It is not the which chose the new gas, it is the industry which decided on it after testing," Corraza said.

The new gas was tested extensively and approved by the German Automakers Association, VDA, of which Daimler is a member.

argued, however, that when it came to adapting its new models, it ran into problems with the new which proved highly inflammable in certain cases. Accordingly it asked for an extra six months to meet the new standard.

Corraza said the Commission had "noted the request" but reiterated that all new auto models sold in the EU from January 1 onwards had to use the new coolant.

"The German authorities are tasked with testing vehicles and those that do not meet the new rules ought not to be registered," he added.

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User comments : 1

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A2G
3 / 5 (2) Jan 11, 2013
When bureaucrats are telling engineers, and German engineers at that how to do their job, we ll know that this will end up well.

Anyone who has ever had to deal with a gov regulatory agency can tell you horror stories of ignorance and incompetence. I am all for rules when it comes to things.

So who regulates the regulators? Who ensures that they actually understand what they are doing?

Let's name a few. FDA, DEA, EPA. If you have dealt with any of these you will know what I mean.

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