EU asks citizens to join debate on GM food

Jan 15, 2013

The European Union on Tuesday took the debate about genetically modified crops to the public with a survey asking citizens to share their thoughts on organic farming.

The bloc's 500 million consumers are invited to complete an anonymous online questionnaire on the European Commission's Agriculture and Rural Development website (ec.europa.eu/agriculture/consultations/organic/2013_en.htm).

The consultation, which ends on April 10, is part of a review of European policy on .

Noting that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are considered incompatible with , the survey asks participants whether they specifically buy organic products because they are "GMO-free" and whether consumers would put up with higher prices if it meant the accidental low-level presence of GMO in organic products was clearly labelled.

"Organic farming covers a relatively limited part of the EU's utilised —around five percent—but the sector is driven by ever-increasing consumer demand," says the website.

"In the current , will consumers continue to turn towards a more sustainable lifestyle and higher consumption of organic products?"

The initiative from the office of EU agriculture commissioner Dacian Ciolos aims to reignite the debate on growing genetically modified food inside the bloc.

The EU has so far approved the cultivation of just two types of genetically altered crops, the Amflora potato developed by German group and MON810 maize developed by global seeds giant Monsanto—though several member countries have banned the growing of this variety of corn.

The European Commission has yet to make a decision on allowing the proposed cultivation of six other strains of genetically modified corn and one type of GM soy.

Explore further: First sex determining genes appeared in mammals 180 million years ago

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Poland bans cultivation of GM maize, potatoes

Jan 02, 2013

Poland on Wednesday imposed new bans on the cultivation of certain genetically modified strains of maize and potatoes, a day after an EU required green light for GM crops took effect.

GMO maize strain safe: EU food agency

Jun 30, 2009

A genetically modified strain of maize, banned in some EU countries, poses no risk to health or the environment, the European Food Safety Authority declared Tuesday.

EU tightens control of Chinese rice over GM fears

Nov 15, 2011

The European Union has tightened controls on imports of Chinese rice products after a growing number of shipments were contaminated by unauthorised genetically-modified rice, the EU said Tuesday.

EU stuck on three new GM authorisations

Dec 16, 2011

Failure by EU agriculture ministers to decide on authorisation for three genetically-modified maize and cotton strains overnight left the matter in the hands of the EU executive on Friday.

Greeks mobilise to protect endangered seeds

May 15, 2011

The remote valley of Mesohori in northeastern Greece seems an unusual choice for a stand against genetically modified crop conglomerates who are knocking on Europe's door.

Recommended for you

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

1 hour ago

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Engineered E. coli produces high levels of D-ribose

2 hours ago

D-ribose is a commercially important sugar used as a sweetener, a nutritional supplement, and as a starting compound for synthesizing riboflavin and several antiviral drugs. Genetic engineering of Escherichia co ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

jamesmoore7122
1 / 5 (1) Feb 08, 2013
Debate of GMO foods is influenced by money power players like Monsanto Company and other big corporation. It is sad to see that even Lynas is backing them up now. No idea what will happen to the human race in the near future. Why is Big Ag and the Government is keeping public out of GMO food safety.

More news stories

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live i ...

Study links California drought to global warming

While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it is not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought ...

Autism Genome Project delivers genetic discovery

A new study from investigators with the Autism Genome Project, the world's largest research project on identifying genes associated with risk for autism, has found that the comprehensive use of copy number variant (CNV) genetic ...