E-book reading on the rise among young people

January 14, 2013

E-books may finally be catching on with the toughest of customers: young people.

A report commissioned by children's publisher Scholastic Inc. finds that 46 percent of respondents aged 9-17 had read an e-book as of 2012, compared to just 25 percent in 2010. And around half of those who have not read an e-book say they want to do so. But the appeal of paper remains. Around 80 percent of kids who read an e-book still read print books, according to Monday's report.

While e-books are believed to comprise around 25 to 30 percent of total book sales, the number has been much lower among children. The rise of and other tablets has helped vastly expand the availability of and other children's books in .

Explore further: Survey: Children like e-books, parents not so much

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