Curiosity's rambling tracks visible from Mars orbit

Jan 17, 2013 by Nancy Atkinson, Universe Today
Tracks from the Curiosity rover were imaged by the HiRISE camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on January 2, 2013. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.

Look closely and see where the Curiosity rover has been roving about inside Gale Crater on Mars, from "Bradbury Landing" to its current location in "Yellowknife Bay." This shot was taken by the HiRISE camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on January 2, 2013.

"This image shows the entire distance traveled from the landing site (dark smudge at left) to its location as of 2 January 2013 (the rover is bright feature at right)," wrote HiRISE principal investigator Alfred McEwen on the HiRISE website. "The tracks are not seen where the rover has recently driven over the lighter-toned surface, which may be more indurated [hardened] than the darker soil."

You can compare this image to one taken on September 8, 2012 to see how much the rover has driven in Gale Crater:

Curiosity rover tracks seen from orbit by HiRISE on September 8, 2012. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.

And here's a map of Curiosity's travels that NASA released yesterday:

Mission scientists said at a briefing yesterday (January 15, 2013) that between Sol (Martian day) 120 and Sol 121 of the mission—which equates to Dec. 7 and Dec. 8, 2012—Curiosity crossed over a terrain boundary into lighter-toned rocks that correspond to high thermal inertia values observed by 's orbiter. The green dashed line marks the boundary between the terrain types.

The inset graphs the range in ground temperature recorded each day by the Rover Station (REMS) on Curiosity. Note that the arrival onto the lighter-toned terrain corresponds with an abrupt shift in the range of daily ground temperatures to a consistently smaller spread in values. This independently signals the same transition seen from orbit, and marks the arrival at well-exposed, stratified bedrock.

Sol 124 (Dec. 11, 2012) marked the arrival into an area called "," where sulfate-filled veins and concretions were discovered, along with much finer-grained sediments providing evidence of past water interacting with the surface.

Here's the weather report provided by REMS for Sol 158 (January 15, 2013):

Curiosity’s rambling tracks visible from Mars orbit
Daily Weather Report. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A video showing the new HiRISE image of Curiosity's tracks:

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.


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dschlink
not rated yet Jan 17, 2013
What I find really amazing is that HiRISE can show both tracks clearly.
deatopmg
1 / 5 (1) Jan 17, 2013
@dschlink that's because the vast majority of released photo's are highly compressed or tampered w/ before compressing.

For PR releases like this one, NASA/JPL/MSSS are willing to release much less compressed photos - after tampering as needed of course.
robeph
not rated yet Jan 17, 2013
@deatopmg, Paranoia is indicative of more serious mental disturbances, perhaps you should go see a doctor?

As for full res photos. They exist. They're not even hard to find. But that wouldn't support your crackpot theories. They also don't doctor the photos; I can't even fathom a reason they'd find that necessary.