Will changes in climate wipe out mammals in Arctic and sub-Arctic areas?

Jan 14, 2013
The lemming is a species that will decline if the climate changes in the way climatologists predict. This lemming is a bit wet following a swim in the Vindel River in northern Sweden. Credit: Christer Nilsson

The climate changes depicted by climatologists up to the year 2080 will benefit most mammals that live in northern Europe's Arctic and sub-Arctic land areas today if they are able to reach their new climatic ranges. This is the conclusion drawn by ecologists at Umeå University in a recently published article in the journal Plos ONE.

The scientists Anouschka Hof, Roland Jansson, and Christer Nilsson of the Department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University investigated how future climate changes may come to impact mammals in 's Arctic and sub-Arctic , excluding the Arctic seas and islands. These land masses are assumed to undergo major changes in climate, and their natural ecology is also regarded as especially susceptible to changes.

By modeling the distribution of species, the researchers have determined that the predicted climate changes up to the year 2080 will benefit most mammals that live in these areas today, with the exception of some specialists in , such as the Arctic fox and the lemming.

"This will be the case only on the condition that the species can reach the areas that take on the climate these animals are adapted to. We maintain that it is highly improbable that all mammals will be able to do so, owing partly to the increased fragmentation of their living environments caused by human beings. Such species will reduce the extent of their distribution instead," says Christer Nilsson, professor of .

The researchers also show that even if climate changes as such do not threaten the majority of Arctic and sub-Arctic mammals, changes in the species mix may do so, for instance because predators and their potential prey that previously did not live together may wind up in the same areas.

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More information: Future Climate Change Will Favour Non-Specialist Mammals in the (Sub)Arctics, www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0052574

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User comments : 4

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ScooterG
1.5 / 5 (8) Jan 15, 2013
Question: "Will changes in climate wipe out mammals in Arctic and sub-Arctic areas?"

Answer: Yes. Climate change will wipe out all mammals everywhere, even those in Arctic and sub-Arctic areas.
ScooterG
1.5 / 5 (8) Jan 15, 2013
Question: But the animals are sooo cute! Is there any way to save them?

Answer: Yes. Do not drive your car, do not heat or cool your home or office (totally disconnect from the grid), do not use your computer or cell phone, do not purchase any product that requires energy to manufacture, do not eat unless you grow the food in your back yard. Only then can the animals avoid being "wiped out".

For more animal-saving tips and "what you can do to undo what you are doing", visit our website: http://www. Guilt-RiddenChumps-R-Us. com
FrankHerbert
2.4 / 5 (10) Jan 15, 2013
It's curious that even though you claim AGW is totally false, you still defend it as if it were true.
VendicarD
2.9 / 5 (8) Jan 15, 2013
ScooTard irrational and emotional response provides us with a wonderful example of why compliance to rational goals will require economic and regulatory coercion.

He has only himself to blame.

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