Chile's 'Power-opedia' shines light on elites

Jan 17, 2013
A man looks at the Poderopedia website in Santiago, on January 16, 2013. Journalists and concerned citizens can now trawl for conflicts of interest among Chile's political and business elites thanks to a new startup based on Wikipedia.

Journalists and concerned citizens can now trawl for conflicts of interest among Chile's political and business elites thanks to a new startup based on Wikipedia.

Launched late last year, "Poderopedia" (Spanish for Power-opedia), aims to encourage greater transparency by shining a light on the of political and business connections in the country.

The website, which already has won a Knight News Challenge prize, maps out politicians' connections based on public information, such as government and business databases, financial statements and directories.

Journalists then verify the information before mapping the connections.

"Knowing who are in the spheres of influence of power, and what they have, helps you understand a lot of things," Founder and CEO Miguel Paz, a journalist by training, told AFP.

So far, about 4,000 people, businesses and organizations have been mapped.

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antialias_physorg
not rated yet Jan 17, 2013
Simple. Elegant. Effective.
I hope we get something similar for each country (and globally).
A really excellent idea!
tarheelchief
not rated yet Jan 17, 2013
One would hope the local and state governments would adopt an open air policy listing all business and family dealings of public officials,including medical schools,law schools,universities,police,fire,sewer and paving contractors.
Squirrel
not rated yet Jan 18, 2013
Democracy cannot properly exist without Poderopedias. The Chileans and Miguel Paz have done us a great service--lets hope all democracies have their own Poderopedias very soon.

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