Unilever to phase out 'microplastics' by 2015

Dec 28, 2012

(AP)—Unilever, the maker of Vaseline, Axe deodorants and Dove soaps, among other cosmetic and hygiene products, says it will phase out the use of microplastics by 2015.

Many soaps, skin scrubs and shower gels contain microplastics, which are tiny polyethelene beads. Scientists and environmental groups are concerned that they contribute to polluting oceans.

The company said Thursday that it has "decided to phase out the use of plastic micro beads as a 'scrub' material in all of our " by 2015.

Unilever is one of the world's largest consumer product companies, competing with Nestle SA and Procter & Gamble Co.

Explore further: New research shows temperatures vary block by block

5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microplastics endanger ocean health

May 17, 2012

Tiny pieces of plastic contaminate almost every sea in the world. Now scientists have found that marine creatures like fish and birds are eating this microscopic waste, which may be harming their health.

J&J removing harsh chemicals from products by 2015

Aug 15, 2012

(AP) — Johnson & Johnson plans to remove trace amounts of potentially cancer-causing and other dangerous chemicals from nearly all its adult toiletries and cosmetic products worldwide in less than four ...

Recommended for you

The underestimated risk of ethanol fireplaces

4 hours ago

Ethanol fireplaces are becoming more and more popular. However, they are not only highly combustible – in the past, severe accents have occurred repeatedly with decorative fireplaces. The devices also pollute ...

New research shows temperatures vary block by block

5 hours ago

This summer has seen the temperature rise above the severe heat mark of 90 degrees just five times, with the latest happening Wednesday afternoon. That's far fewer times than in an average New York summer.

Could Iceland volcano disrupt air travel?

7 hours ago

Following further reports of seismic activity around volcanoes in Iceland, scientists from the University's Department of Meteorology provide comment on the likelihood of an eruption - and how any ash plume ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Whydening Gyre
1 / 5 (3) Dec 28, 2012
While this is not actually a "scientific" article, it is does chronicle an action taken as a result of science prediction.
It indicates a corporate entity exercising responsibility and foresight. Kudo's to Unilever.