UK government lifts ban on gas 'fracking'

Dec 13, 2012
The British government on Thursday ended the suspension of the controversial shale gas extraction method known as fracking

The British government on Thursday ended the suspension of the controversial shale gas extraction method known as fracking in Britain.

Energy Secretary Ed Davey announced the lifting of the ban put in place in June last year after fracking contributed to two small earthquakes near Blackpool, Lancashire.

British energy firm Cuadrilla Resources halted drilling trials on Lancashire's Fylde coast after saying they were the likely cause of a 2.3-magnitude tremor in April 2011 and a 1.5-magnitude tremor the following month.

Davey said that fracking could resume in Britain subject to new controls which aim to reduce the risk of seismic activity.

Fracking, or , involves blasting chemicals, water and sand into underground shale rock formations to release trapped natural gas.

Opponents say it causes but energy groups say it provides access to considerable new gas reserves and could drive down prices.

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced the creation of a new Office for Unconventional Gas and Oil to simplify regulation of the sector and speed up production as part of his Autumn Statement on December 5.

Explore further: Fracking in UK national parks allowed in 'exceptional circumstances'

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User comments : 5

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Kev_C
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2012
Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne announced the creation of a new Office for Unconventional Gas and Oil to simplify regulation of the sector and speed up production as part of his Autumn Statement on December 5.

I wonder why he did that? But of course. Simplify! Make easier! Stop the protests! Can't have these green nutters getting in the way of a good 'Fracking' now can we?

Kev_C
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2012
This is all greenwash at its best. There is nothing safe or green about this technology. It is merely another way of snaring the masses into the never ending cycle of dependency on fossil fuels.
All it says is: 'Stuff climate changing gas emissions we want energy' when in reality most of the people don't even now what it is and the rest are shouting like crazy to stop it.
There is no such thing as a democratic government in the West anymore. They have all sold out to the devil corporations for their slice of the profits. Which is not all its cracked up to be. Wonder how they will survive when the brown sticky stuff hits the fan? Probably order the army to shoot us all.
ValeriaT
1.7 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2012
It is merely another way of snaring the masses into the never ending cycle of dependency on fossil fuels
The masses should call for cold fusion research funding at the same moment. Without it it's just a hopeless situation.
kochevnik
1 / 5 (3) Dec 13, 2012
English tap water is already piss in any case.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (1) Dec 14, 2012
The British government afraids of earthquakes, rather than contamination of ground water. Just the very first attempts for fracking near Blackpool did lead into wave of seismic events.