Shot away from its companion, giant star makes waves

December 19, 2012 by Whitney Clavin
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

(Phys.org)—Like a ship plowing through still waters, the giant star Zeta Ophiuchi is speeding through space, making waves in the dust ahead. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured a dramatic, infrared portrait of these glowing waves, also known as a bow shock.

Astronomers theorize that this star was once sitting pretty next to a even heftier than itself. But when that star died in a fiery explosion, Zeta Ophiuchi was kicked away and sent flying. Zeta Ophiuchi, which is 20 times more massive and 80,000 times brighter than our sun, is racing along at about 54,000 mph (24 kilometers per second).

In this view, infrared light that we can't see with our eyes has been assigned visible colors. Zeta Ophiuchi appears as the bright blue star at center. As it charges through the dust, which appears green, fierce stellar winds push the material into waves. Where the waves are the most compressed, and the warmest, they appear red. This is analogous to the ripples that precede the bow of a ship as it moves through the water, or the pileup of air ahead of a supersonic airplane that results in a .

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, released a similar picture of the same object in 2011. WISE sees infrared light as does Spitzer, but WISE was an all-sky survey designed to take snapshots of the entire sky. Spitzer, by contrast, observes less of the sky, but in more detail. The WISE image can be seen at: phys.org/news/2011-01-runaway-star-plows-space.html .

Explore further: Runaway star plows through space

More information: For more information about Spitzer, visit spitzer.caltech.edu and www.nasa.gov/spitzer.

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2 comments

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rubberman
3 / 5 (2) Dec 19, 2012
This is what happens when a star actually moves through the ISM, hence a heliospheric/ISM bow shock. The description of the process in the article could use a little work. Love the picture.
Widdekind
1 / 5 (2) Dec 26, 2012
Inexpertly, the thick, dense bow shock shows, that dust resides everywhere, even if normally too diffuse and/or cold to be observable

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