New study reveals what makes nonprofits special

December 6, 2012

Despite their diversity, U.S. nonprofits are in basic agreement that seven core values—being productive, effective, enriching, empowering, responsive, reliable, and caring—set the nonprofit sector apart from government and for-profit businesses, according to a new report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies' Listening Post Project. Nonprofit leaders believe that stakeholders in government, the media, and the general public do not understand these values of the nonprofit sector—a situation that needs to be remedied to ensure the survival of the nonprofit sector in light of ongoing challenges.

This is a crucial time for around the country. As the federal government moves to avoid the fiscal cliff, proposals to reduce or cap the federal tax deduction for charitable contributions have become an increasingly common feature of budget-balancing measures from both ends of the political spectrum. And on the state and local levels, governments are imposing new taxes and fees on nonprofits in order to make ends meet. Meanwhile, shifts in government payment methods that advantage for-profit businesses have resulted in a reduction of nonprofit in many traditional nonprofit fields. Over the past decade, the nonprofit share of private employment has decreased by nearly 8 percent in social assistance, by 4 percent in education, and by 2 percent in health care as for-profit employment in those fields has expanded.

These ongoing challenges are not happening in a vacuum. Increasingly, the realities of nonprofit operations have diverged from the popular understanding of what a nonprofit is and how it operates. As Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies director Lester Salamon states: "In recent years, nonprofits have responded to the fiscal pressures they are under by becoming more commercial in their operations. But this has pulled them away from their traditional values and put their public support at risk. Now is therefore the time for nonprofits to renew their value commitments and to develop the tools needed to communicate those values to the sector's stakeholders in government, the public, and within the sector itself."

In order to start that process, the Johns Hopkins Listening Post Project conducted a first-ever survey to gauge the thinking within the nonprofit community around the sector's values. Over 750 nonprofits of various sizes operating in the three core nonprofit fields of human services, community development, and the arts responded to a survey asking them to rate how important a set of key values were to the operation of their organizations. The survey revealed widespread consensus around the sector's key values, important evidence that nonprofit organizations are embodying these values in their work, but also serious concerns about how effectively these values are being conveyed to important sector stakeholders.

By offering nonprofits a common set of words and concepts to frame the discussion of their public benefit, this research promises to help nonprofits better understand their own special value and to articulate it to key .

"These values reinforce the fact that the not-for-profit sector is an essential component of American society because it brings out the best in all of us," said Larry Minnix, President and CEO of LeadingAge and chairman of the Listening Post Project Steering Committee. "It is time for a not-for-profit spirit of renewal in our country where the sector reclaims its strengths, recommits to its unique responsibilities for the public good, and society recognizes the sector's enduring contributions in improving the quality of our lives. This Listening Post Project report on these values summarizes in new and fresh ways why and how the sector's mission is so important."

Explore further: Study: Nonprofits put brand at risk in corporate partnerships

More information: The full text of the report "What do Nonprofits Stand For? Renewing the nonprofit value commitment," is available on the Johns Hopkins Center for Civil Society Studies website at bit.ly/npvalues

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bertibus
2 / 5 (8) Dec 06, 2012
Self-serving PR.
Non-profits should be subject to every bureaucratic requirement that wealth-producing enterprises have to endure, and more.
They should also be heavily regulated as to salaries paid and all external commercial relationships.
rwinners
2 / 5 (4) Dec 07, 2012
One roadblock might be that the general population views non-profits as religions, or as other's religions, or as atheistic.
Communication is a key.

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