NASA sees Wukong struggling to survive in South China Sea

Dec 28, 2012
NASA sees Wukong struggling to survive in South China Sea
This image of Tropical Depression Wukong from 10:28 p.m. EST on Dec. 27 combines rainfall from NASA's TRMM satellite and the MTSAT-2 satellite. It showed one area of moderate rainfall (yellow) falling at a rate of about 1 inch/25 mm per hour. Most of the other precipitation in the storm is lighter and scattered. Credit: NASA/NRL

NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall data on Tropical Depression Wukong as it struggles to stay together in the South China Sea. Wukong has been battered with wind shear for days and NASA satellite data still shows an area of moderate rainfall within the dying storm.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or passed over Tropical Depression Wukong on Dec. 28 at 0328 UTC (10:28 p.m. EST, Dec. 27) and saw one area of moderate rainfall near the center of circulation. That area was generating a rainfall rate of about 1 inch/25 mm per hour. Most of the other precipitation in the storm is lighter and scattered.

On Dec. 28 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) Tropical Depression Wukong had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). Satellite data helped pinpoint Wukong's center near 8.7 north latitude and 111.0 east longitude, about 280 miles (322 miles/518.6 km) east of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. Wukong continues to move to the west-southwest staying south of Vietnam.

Wukong is moving around the southern edge of a ridge (elongated) area of high pressure and being battered with moderate southeasterly . According to the forecasters at the Joint (JTWC), the wind shear has exposed the low level circulation center.

JTWC forecasters expect the depression to continue moving west-southwest over the next day or two before finally dissipating.

Explore further: NASA's HS3 mission covers transition of Hurricane Cristobal

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

NASA HS3 instrument views two dimensions of clouds

3 hours ago

NASA's Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument, flying aboard an unmanned Global Hawk aircraft in this summer's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3, mission, is studying the changing profile of the atmosphere ...

Research drones launched into Hurricane Edouard

5 hours ago

U.S. government scientists are launching winged drones into Hurricane Edouard, hoping to collect data that could help forecasters understand what makes some storms strengthen into monsters while others fade away.

User comments : 0