NASA sees Wukong struggling to survive in South China Sea

Dec 28, 2012
NASA sees Wukong struggling to survive in South China Sea
This image of Tropical Depression Wukong from 10:28 p.m. EST on Dec. 27 combines rainfall from NASA's TRMM satellite and the MTSAT-2 satellite. It showed one area of moderate rainfall (yellow) falling at a rate of about 1 inch/25 mm per hour. Most of the other precipitation in the storm is lighter and scattered. Credit: NASA/NRL

NASA's TRMM satellite captured rainfall data on Tropical Depression Wukong as it struggles to stay together in the South China Sea. Wukong has been battered with wind shear for days and NASA satellite data still shows an area of moderate rainfall within the dying storm.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or passed over Tropical Depression Wukong on Dec. 28 at 0328 UTC (10:28 p.m. EST, Dec. 27) and saw one area of moderate rainfall near the center of circulation. That area was generating a rainfall rate of about 1 inch/25 mm per hour. Most of the other precipitation in the storm is lighter and scattered.

On Dec. 28 at 0900 UTC (4 a.m. EST) Tropical Depression Wukong had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28.7 mph/46.3 kph). Satellite data helped pinpoint Wukong's center near 8.7 north latitude and 111.0 east longitude, about 280 miles (322 miles/518.6 km) east of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam. Wukong continues to move to the west-southwest staying south of Vietnam.

Wukong is moving around the southern edge of a ridge (elongated) area of high pressure and being battered with moderate southeasterly . According to the forecasters at the Joint (JTWC), the wind shear has exposed the low level circulation center.

JTWC forecasters expect the depression to continue moving west-southwest over the next day or two before finally dissipating.

Explore further: How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

14 hours ago

About ten years after the first moon landing, scientists on earth made a discovery that proved that our home planet still holds a lot of surprises in store for us. Looking through the portholes of the submersible ...

NASA image: Volcanoes in Guatemala

18 hours ago

This photo of volcanoes in Guatemala was taken from NASA's C-20A aircraft during a four-week Earth science radar imaging mission deployment over Central and South America. The conical volcano in the center ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Untangling Brazil's controversial new forest code

Approved in 2012, Brazil's new Forest Code has few admirers. Agricultural interests argue that it threatens the livelihoods of farmers. Environmentalists counter that it imperils millions of hectares of forest, ...

Study links California drought to global warming

While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it is not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought ...

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.