NASA sees Cyclone Evan blown apart by wind shear

Dec 20, 2012
This infrared image from NOAA's GOES-15 satellite on Dec. 20 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) shows the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Evan blown apart by very strong wind shear, northeast of New Zealand (lower left). The low pressure center is northwest of all of Evan's associated remnant clouds. Credit: NASA / NOAA GOES Project

Cyclone Evan is no more than a remnant low pressure area in the South Pacific Ocean now. NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured an image of the remnants from its fixed orbit in space on Dec. 20 that showed strong wind shear had basically blown the storm apart.

The last official bulletin by the Joint was issued on Dec. 19 at 2100 UTC (4 p.m. EST/U.S. or 12:56 a.m. Fiji local time on Dec. 20). At that time, Evan's were still near 35 knots (40 mph/64.8 kph) and it had transitioned into an extra-tropical storm. It was located 400 nautical miles south of Nadi, Fiji, near 24.3 south latitude and 178.5 east longitude. Evan was moving to the south-southeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph). Evan has since become a remnant low pressure system.

NOAA's GOES-15 satellite captured an infrared image of Evan's remnants on Dec. 20 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) showed the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone Evan blown apart by very strong , northeast of New Zealand. The low pressure center appears northwest of the plume of clouds associated Evan's remnants. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Northwesterly wind shear continued to be very strong, blowing between 40 and 50 knots (46 and 57.5 mph/74 and 92.6 kph) and cooler ocean waters were weakening Evan quickly.

Evan has now gone into the history books as one of the strongest cyclones to hit Fiji and American Samoa in recent memory.

Explore further: Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA sees dangerous category 4 Cyclone Evan lashing Fiji

Dec 17, 2012

Cyclone Evan is one of the strongest cyclones to affect Fiji in almost two decades, and NASA satellites are analyzing the storm and providing data on rainfall, cloud height, temperature data and more to forecasters.

Recommended for you

Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot

17 hours ago

Spectacular eruptions at Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland have been spewing lava continuously since Aug. 31. Massive amounts of erupting lava are connected to the destruction of supercontinents and ...

NASA sees Tropical Storm Ana still vigorous

19 hours ago

NASA's TRMM satellite saw that Tropical Storm Ana was still generating moderate rainfall is it pulled away from Hawaii. The next day, NASA's Aqua satellite saw that wind shear was having an effect on the ...

User comments : 0