Japan security firm to offer private drone

Dec 27, 2012
This handout picture, released by Japanese security company Secom on December 27, 2012, shows a private drone, produced by Germany's Ascending Technologies, with a small surveillance camera that can transmit live pictures of a crime taking place.

A Japanese security company plans to rent out a private drone that takes off when intruder alarms are tripped and records footage of break-ins as they happen, a spokeswoman said on Thursday.

The helicopter-like device is equipped with a small that can transmit live pictures of a crime taking place.

"The could take off if our online security systems detect any unauthorised entry," Asuka Saito, a spokeswoman for Secom, said.

"It would enable us to quickly check out what's actually happening on the spot," she said.

The machine with four sets of is based on a model provided by Germany's Ascending Technologies and equipped with Secom-developed software, camera and other devices, Saito said.

The company says the world's first autonomous private for security use measures 60 centimetres (24 inches) wide and weighs 1.6 kilogrammes (3.5 pounds) and will allow factory managers to monitor areas left uncovered by static cameras.

Firms in Japan will be able to rent the drone as part of Secom's online security system for around 5,000 yen ($58) a month some time after April 2014, Saito said, adding the company would also like to offer the service in other countries.

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User comments : 3

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Lurker2358
3 / 5 (4) Dec 27, 2012
Just wait till you see the stuff that'll be on Facebook and Youtube within a week or two after these hit the market.
indio007
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 27, 2012
There are already private drones. Quite a lot I must say.
www.DIYdrones.com
gwrede
1 / 5 (2) Dec 28, 2012
Yes, now you have to close your bedroom shades even if you live on the 50th floor.

And I think most Hi-Tech office buildings in the future will be without windows. There is something symbolic here, which M$ should pay attention to.

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