Instagram says users' photos won't appear in ads

Dec 19, 2012 by Barbara Ortutay
In this Monday, April 9, 2012, file photo, Instagram is demonstrated on an iPhone, in New York. Instagram, the popular photo-sharing service that Facebook bought this year, is the target of a storm of outrage on Twitter and other sites after the company announced Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 a change in its user agreement that hinted that it might use shared photos in ads. (AP Photo/Karly Domb Sadof, File)

Instagram says it will revise a planned update to its service agreement after confusion about its intent led to widespread user complaints.

At issue is whether users' photos can be part of advertisements, on and off Instagram. The mobile photo-sharing company said in a blog post Tuesday that it has no plans to put users' photos in advertisements.

That said, Instagram maintains that it was created to become a business and would like to experiment with various forms of advertisements to make money.

The new policy will take effect Jan. 16.

Developments in photo-sharing service Instagram

This week, Instagram announced new policies to reflect its growth and new ownership. Some of the changes regarding how members' photos may be used in ads sparked complaints on and elsewhere. Here's a look at key developments in Instagram's service.

— April 3: Instagram, a photo-sharing social network accessed on smartphones, arrives on Android devices after starting out as an app available only on Apple gadgets such as the .

— April 9: Facebook Inc. announces plans to buy Instagram for $1 billion in cash and stock.

— May 18: Facebook's stock begins trading publicly. After a small increase on its first day, the tumbles amid concerns about the company's ability to keep growing revenue.

— Aug. 22: Federal government clears Instagram deal. Because of Facebook's falling stock price, the $1 billion cash-and- drops to about $750 million.

— Aug. 31: closes on its Instagram deal, which by then is worth about $715 million—$300 million of it in cash and the rest in stock.

— Nov. 5: Instagram expands to the Web, though in limited form. Previously, users' profiles existed only on Instagram's . With the change, users have a website with a profile photo, bio and a selection of the snapshots they've recently shared on Instagram, though they can't follow other users or upload photos.

— Monday: Instagram announces new terms of service and privacy policy to take effect Jan. 16. Users and privacy advocates complain over Instagram's new assertion that it may now receive payments from businesses to use your photos, user name and other data "in connection with paid or sponsored content or promotions, without any compensation to you."

Explore further: Brazil passes trailblazing Internet privacy law

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Instagram to share data with Facebook

Dec 17, 2012

Smartphone photo sharing service Instagram on Monday refined its privacy policy to clear the way for sharing data with Facebook, which bought the company earlier this year.

Photo feud escalates between Instagram, Twitter

Dec 10, 2012

A social media feud between Twitter and Instagram has escalated as the Facebook-owned photo-sharing service made it impossible for Internet users to integrate images from tweets. ...

App clash: Instagram shuts off Twitter feature

Dec 05, 2012

The smartphone app Instagram turned off a feature Wednesday that allowed easier photo viewing for Twitter users, in a move that pushes the two popular tech platforms farther apart.

Twitter adds Instagram-style photo features

Dec 11, 2012

Twitter on Monday added Instagram-style smartphone photo sharing features after the Facebook-owned service made it impossible for Internet users to integrate its images into tweets.

Recommended for you

Brazil passes trailblazing Internet privacy law

11 hours ago

Brazil's Congress on Tuesday passed comprehensive legislation on Internet privacy in what some have likened to a web-user's bill of rights, after stunning revelations its own president was targeted by US ...

Research shows impact of Facebook unfriending

Apr 22, 2014

Two studies from the University of Colorado Denver are shedding new light on the most common type of `friend' to be unfriended on Facebook and their emotional responses to it.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Amazon Prime wins streaming deal with HBO

Amazon scored a deal Wednesday to distribute old shows from premium cable TV channel HBO to its monthly Prime subscribers, landing a blow on rival Netflix in the streaming video battle.

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

"I think one can argue that if we were to follow a strong nuclear energy pathway—as well as doing everything else that we can—then we can solve the climate problem without doing geoengineering." So says Tom Wigley, one ...

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

Cyber buddy is better than 'no buddy'

A Michigan State University researcher is looking to give exercise enthusiasts the extra nudge they need during a workout, and her latest research shows that a cyber buddy can help.