Experts examine the potential for self-driving cars in the UK

Dec 05, 2012

(Phys.org)—Researchers from Lancaster University Management School have explored what it would take for driverless vehicles to become commonplace on UK roads.

They highlight the potential benefits of self-driving cars, such as increased road safety and less traffic, but stress that a range of barriers need to be overcome before people buy them en masse.

The report "Self driving cars: a case study in making new markets" is by Professor Luis Araujo, Dr Katy Mason and Dr Martin Spring from Lancaster University Management School.

Professor Araujo said: "Self-driving cars could bring huge benefits, but they are still a long way from becoming an everyday reality. We must persuade a range of constituencies that self-driving cars are the way to address the transport problems of the 21st century, as well as being a safe and effective technology. Markets are social constructs as much as they are technical and economic constructs. We need to think more about how new technologies interact with existing infrastructures.

"When the first cars were developed over a century ago, drivers often found themselves stranded if they broke down, with only a token repair and refuelling services network available to deal with problems. Autonomous cars may face the same issues. Equally, there may be serious questions about legal liability should self-driving cars be involved in .

Lastly, the security of the digital systems self-driving cars run on could present a further set of challenges. Unless these issues can be satisfactorily addressed, self-driving cars are unlikely to take off."

Self-driving cars are one of the many new technologies, like 3D printing, which could transform the UK economy.

The Government must do more to turn these new technologies into jobs and growth, according to a report by the business-backed Big Innovation Centre, an initiative of The Work Foundation and Lancaster University.

Andrew Sissons, co-report author of "Market Making: A modern approach to industrial policy" and researcher at the Big Innovation Centre said: "The Government has identified a large number of technologies that could transform the UK economy – 53 of them to be precise – but it must go further in helping entrepreneurs bring them to market. There are a whole series of barriers facing new technologies, and individual businesses and entrepreneurs can rarely tackle them alone. Often they need help from governments."

Explore further: Lego-like modular components make building 3-D 'labs-on-a-chip' a snap

More information: biginnovationcentre.com/Assets… %20new%20markets.pdf

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eachus
not rated yet Dec 05, 2012
There are exactly two issues to be resolved before driverless cars become commonplace. The first is the perception that most of these cars would be end-user consumer vehicles. In most areas, driverless cabs would dominate. (The cost of a car sitting in a parking lot or garage all day includes both car and parking garage.)

The second fix needed, and it is not a big one, but requires both insurers and governments to step up and set up a system for allocating costs in crashes. Notice that none of this would go to the user directly. (If you don't own a car or drive one, you won't carry car insurance.) Why are governments involved? Because events like bridge collapses should get allocated to the government if they are responsible for maintenance. (Bridges and highways owned by quasi-government organizations would need insurance, and to do the maintenance they charge for in tolls.)