Judge allows evidence against man in GPS case

December 20, 2012 by Frederic J. Frommer

(AP)—A federal judge is allowing prosecutors to use evidence in a drug conspiracy conviction that had been overturned because police used a global positioning system without a warrant.

U.S. Ellen Segal Huvelle in Washington said in a ruling Thursday that Antoine Jones had not established that police would not have discovered the house in Fort Washington, Md., allegedly used to stash money and drugs but for the GPS. She ruled that, "to the contrary," police had identified the property as a likely "stash house" before the GPS was attached to his car.

In 2010, an appeals court reversed Jones' conviction because police used the GPS to track him. The Supreme Court affirmed, agreeing to bar police from installing GPS technology to track suspects without getting a judge's approval.

Explore further: Discovery of GPS tracker becomes privacy issue


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