Learning emotional intelligence is a classroom boon, researchers find

December 6, 2012 by Bill Hathaway
Research in the News: Learning emotional intelligence is a classroom boon, researchers find
Credit: Yale University Health, Emotion, and Behavior Laboratory

Fear, anger, insecurity, and boredom in schools can cripple a classroom and obstruct learning completely.

A new approach to teaching emotional intelligence developed by Yale University researchers improved relationships between teachers and students, and led to greater independence and engagement in learning among students, according to a new study published in the November issue of the journal Prevention Science.

The research team, led by Yale Susan Rivers, Marc Brackett, and Peter Salovey, examined the impact of Yale's RULER Approach, designed to increase the emotional skills of students and teachers.

The William T. Grant Foundation supported the conducted in fifth and sixth grade classrooms in 62 schools.

Explore further: Researchers examine how teachers can increase students' interest and engagement in the classroom

More information: link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11121-012-0305-2

Related Stories

Virtual learning environments put new demands on teachers

April 23, 2012

Introduction of hi-tech teaching aids in the classroom often comes with great hopes for enhanced learning. Yet a new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows that new technologies per se do not improve ...

Recommended for you

Evaluation of scientific rigor in animal research

December 2, 2016

The "reproducibility crisis" in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. In research publishing in the Open Access journals ...

Researchers find evidence of original 1620 Plymouth settlement

November 30, 2016

Three hundred and ninety-five years after Pilgrims celebrated the first Thanksgiving in Plymouth, Massachusetts, researchers from UMass Boston's Andrew Fiske Memorial Center for Archaeological Research can say they have definitively ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.