Learning emotional intelligence is a classroom boon, researchers find

December 6, 2012 by Bill Hathaway
Research in the News: Learning emotional intelligence is a classroom boon, researchers find
Credit: Yale University Health, Emotion, and Behavior Laboratory

Fear, anger, insecurity, and boredom in schools can cripple a classroom and obstruct learning completely.

A new approach to teaching emotional intelligence developed by Yale University researchers improved relationships between teachers and students, and led to greater independence and engagement in learning among students, according to a new study published in the November issue of the journal Prevention Science.

The research team, led by Yale Susan Rivers, Marc Brackett, and Peter Salovey, examined the impact of Yale's RULER Approach, designed to increase the emotional skills of students and teachers.

The William T. Grant Foundation supported the conducted in fifth and sixth grade classrooms in 62 schools.

Explore further: Confident teachers help preschoolers more with language and literacy skills

More information: link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11121-012-0305-2

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