China prepares to grow vegetables on Mars

Dec 04, 2012
A NASA colour image of the surface of Mars taken August 23 by the rover Curiosity. Chinese astronauts are preparing to grow fresh vegetables on Mars and the moon after researchers successfully completed a preliminary test in Beijing, state media reported.

Chinese astronauts are preparing to grow fresh vegetables on Mars and the moon after researchers successfully completed a preliminary test in Beijing, state media reported.

Four kinds of vegetables were grown in an "ecological life support system", a 300 cubic metre cabin which will allow astronauts to develop their own stocks of air, water and food while on , said Monday.

The system, which relies on plants and algae, is "expected to be used in extra-terrestrial bases on the moon or Mars", the report said.

Participants in the experiment could "harvest fresh vegetables for meals", Xinhua quoted Deng Yibing, a researcher at Beijing's Chinese Astronaut Research and Training Centre, as saying.

"Chinese astronauts may get fresh vegetables and oxygen supplies by gardening in extra-terrestrial bases in the future," the report said, adding that the experiment was the first of its kind in China.

China has said it will land an exploratory craft on the moon for the first time next year, as part of an ambitious programme that includes a long-term plan for a manned moon landing.

The Asian superpower has been ramping up its manned space activities as the United States, long the leader in the field, has scaled back some of its programmes, such as retiring its iconic space shuttle fleet.

In its last white paper on space, China said it was working towards landing a man on the moon—a feat so far only achieved by the United States, most recently in 1972—although it did not give a time frame.

China's first astronaut Yang Liwei said last month that may start a branch of China's ruling Communist Party in space, state media reported.

"If we establish a party branch in space, it would also be the 'highest' of its kind in the world," Xinhua quoted Yang as saying.

The astronaut was launched into space and orbited the earth aboard the Shenzhou 5 spacecraft in 2003.

Explore further: NASA's SDO shows moon transiting the Sun

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PJS
2.8 / 5 (6) Dec 04, 2012
too bad kung pao chicken isn't a vegetable
VendicarD
5 / 5 (3) Dec 04, 2012
China is planning to grow vegetables on Mars.

America can't stop growing vegetables in the classroom.
extinct
1.8 / 5 (5) Dec 05, 2012
hmm let's see... the Mars atmosphere is 1% as dense as earth's atmosphere, and it is 95% carbon dioxide, with a few other trace gases. good luck 1) sending a plant there, and 2) getting it to grow in those conditions
Sinister1811
1.7 / 5 (6) Dec 05, 2012
They'll have to grow them in greenhouses, controlling the temperatures, pressures, etc. Not an easy task. Also, neither the lunar or Martian soil contain organic nutrients, so they'll probably have to bring soil from Earth. Then there's the problem of a lack of weather, rain and trying to find enough water. Certain desert plants would probably be easier to grow.
Allex
3 / 5 (2) Dec 08, 2012
1) sending a plant there, and 2) getting it to grow in those conditions

It's more an experiment to see if it is possible to grow vegetables on martian soil using limited resources like water or nutrients, not sending a bag of potatoes on Mars... :\

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