Astrobiology group among first granted access to new flying observatory

Dec 11, 2012
Airborne scientists search distant stars for complex organic molecules
This graphical representation from the SOFIA Science Center compares two infrared images of the heart of the Orion nebula captured by the FORCAST camera on the SOFIA airborne observatory's telescope with a wider image of the same area from the Spitzer space telescope. Credit: SOFIA-James De Buizer/NASA/DLR/USRA/DSI/FORCAST; Spitzer—NASA/JPL

(Phys.org)—A team of astrobiology researchers—including two from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—will use a series of nighttime flights on an airborne observatory to search newly born stars for the presence of precursors to life.

The scientists, led by Douglas Whittet, director of the New York Center for Astrobiology at Rensselaer, will use the observatory's infrared absorption spectroscopy capabilities to search for a suite of molecules in surrounding five . Their work is part of the first season, or cycle, of research to be performed aboard the Statospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the largest airborne observatory in the world.

A partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center, SOFIA consists of an extensively modified aircraft carrying a reflecting telescope with an effective diameter of 2.5 meters (100 inches). The , based at NASA's Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in California, began a planned-20 year lifetime with its first cycle from November 2012 to December 2013.

"We're interested in how the matter that you need to make planetary life came to be: Where did it come from and how was it formed? And since it happened here in our solar system, is it likely to happen elsewhere as well?" said Whittet, also a professor of physics. "We can't go back in time to observe our solar system when it was born, but we can look at other regions that we believe are similar and use them as analogs for the ."

The scientists will determine the of distant regions through absorption spectrometry, a technique that takes advantage of the fact that different types of matter absorb different segments of the wavelength spectrum generated by a given source of energy – in this case, the newly born star.

Whittet explained that the infrared spectra of newly born stars are rich in absorption features that signal the presence of and water in the dusty remnants of the clouds from which they formed. These dusty remnants are the raw materials from which new planets may coalesce.

Aboard SOFIA, the scientists will be looking at the absorption spectrum of infrared light at wavelengths between 5 and 8 microns. The researchers will search for molecules such as methane, ammonia, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid—early precursors of amino acids. The work is a collaboration between Whittet and Charles Poteet, a post-doctoral research associate at Rensselaer, and researchers at SETI, the California Institute of Technology, Ithaca College, the NASA Ames Research Center, and Johns Hopkins University.

The current project builds upon recent work in which the scientists combined years of existing research to locate areas in outer space that have extreme potential for complex organic molecule formation. Whittet and his collaborators searched for indications of methanol, a key ingredient in the synthesis of organic molecules that could lead to life, and identified a handful of newly formed stars that are surrounded by clouds with a high concentration of methanol (about 30 percent).

For that project, the scientists were able to rely on observations made from ground-based telescopes, but Whittet said only SOFIA has the capability to gather the more specific data they currently seek.

"We're trying to look at a part of the spectrum that doesn't get through the atmosphere very well," Whittet said. "Earth's atmosphere, which contains a lot of moisture, absorbs most of the infrared radiation we want to detect. But SOFIA cruises at an altitude of about 40,000 feet, which is above almost all of the moisture, and allows us an unimpeded view of the stars."

Further, said Whittet, although two space-based instruments equipped with infrared absorption spectrometry capabilities –  NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Infrared Space Observatory, a European  Space Agency satellite – did take observations in that region, neither of them had the appropriate combination of resolution  and sensitivity for the group's current work.

"There's really nothing else out there right now that could collect the data we need for this research," Whittet said.

The scientists were awarded 6.5 hours aboard SOFIA, time which may be used in one or several flights over the Pacific Ocean, and Whittet hopes he will be aboard for the observations. He said the scientists will likely publish findings from their research within a year after collecting the data.

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obama_socks
1.5 / 5 (8) Dec 11, 2012
""There's really nothing else out there right now that could collect the data we need for this research," Whittet said."

Perhaps the needed equipment might be incorporated with the James Webb if it's not too late. These scientists would do well to request space be made for their project on JW.
TheGhostofOtto1923
4.6 / 5 (18) Dec 11, 2012
""There's really nothing else out there right now that could collect the data we need for this research," Whittet said."

Perhaps the needed equipment might be incorporated with the James Webb if it's not too late. These scientists would do well to request space be made for their project on JW.
A NASA engineer (consultant) would know that it is already too late as the webb is under construction, the weight and power budgets have already been determined, and that anyone who would make a comment such as this would have to be, after all, an IMBECILE, let alone a NASA engineer (consultant).
Torbjorn_Larsson_OM
5 / 5 (5) Dec 11, 2012
SOFIA is much more broad band than JWST and complements the US scopes:

"And although SOFIA covers the same part of the spectrum James Webb (JWST) covers, SOFIA is optimized for wavelengths just beyond JWST to complement its observations. SOFIA will do a bang-up job observing between the JWST and Herschel wavelength gap." [ http://science.na...v_sofia/ . And note that SOFIA covers Herschel into the MW band too: http://en.wikiped...ervatory

This was always the rationale for SOFIA: cheap and extensive.

And of course putting it on JWST would be the exact opposite. Mainly, SOFIA is a very intricate vibration dampened camera.

And yeah, _of course_ it is too late!
URaTard
1 / 5 (9) Dec 11, 2012
""There's really nothing else out there right now that could collect the data we need for this research," Whittet said."

Perhaps the needed equipment might be incorporated with the James Webb if it's not too late. These scientists would do well to request space be made for their project on JW.
A NASA engineer (consultant) would know that it is already too late as the webb is under construction, the weight and power budgets have already been determined, and that anyone who would make a comment such as this would have to be, after all, an IMBECILE, let alone a NASA engineer (consultant).
-Theghostofotto1923 aka Blotto

The lying imbecile Blotto huffs and puffs but still is not aware that the launch year for the JWST is 2018.
That's FOUR MORE YEARS, BLOTTO...your desperate, evil little man. There is PLENTY OF TIME for the needed equipment to be added on, you filthy lying piece of shiit. DO SOME RESEARCH BEFORE YOU STICK YOUR FOOT UP YOUR ASS AGAIN.

Just sayin'
URaTard
1 / 5 (10) Dec 11, 2012
SOFIA is much more broad band than JWST and complements the US scopes:

"And although SOFIA covers the same part of the spectrum James Webb (JWST) covers, SOFIA is optimized for wavelengths just beyond JWST to complement its observations. SOFIA will do a bang-up job observing between the JWST and Herschel wavelength gap." [ http://science.na...v_sofia/

This was always the rationale for SOFIA: cheap and extensive.

And of course putting it on JWST would be the exact opposite. Mainly, SOFIA is a very intricate vibration dampened camera.

And yeah, _of course_ it is too late!


naahhh it's not TOO late to include it on JWST. One million miles out is a lot better than the height the plane will take them.
obama_socks
1.4 / 5 (9) Dec 11, 2012
""There's really nothing else out there right now that could collect the data we need for this research," Whittet said."

Perhaps the needed equipment might be incorporated with the James Webb if it's not too late. These scientists would do well to request space be made for their project on JW.


The lying imbecile Blotto huffs and puffs but still is not aware that the launch year for the JWST is 2018.
That's FOUR MORE YEARS, BLOTTO...your desperate, evil little man. There is PLENTY OF TIME for the needed equipment to be added on, you filthy lying piece of shiit. DO SOME RESEARCH BEFORE YOU STICK YOUR FOOT UP YOUR ASS AGAIN.
-URaTard

Hey Buddy...I figured I'd find you in here. LOL I see you're tangling with Blotto. I hope your flight was good. Now get back to work. :)

Just said
FrankHerbert
3.5 / 5 (8) Dec 11, 2012
Are you really dumb enough to think anybody believes URaTard isn't you, pussytard?

I'm not even going to bother to elaborate it's so obvious.

We should play poop_socks madlibs :)

Random quote

-[Username] aka [brainless insult]
The [adj] [noun] [brainless insult] [verb] [fundamental misunderstanding of scientific concept].
[All caps nonsense] [child-like name calling]. [Accusation of sock-puppetry]. [All caps nonsense].

Oh wait, I forgot to gray all that out. You get the point.