Asteroid Toutatis tumbles by Earth

Dec 13, 2012 by Nancy Atkinson, Universe Today
Goldstone delay-Doppler radar images of Toutatis from December 11, 2012. Credit: NASA

While Asteroid 4179 Toutatis was never a threat to hit Earth during its quite-distant pass on Dec. 11-12, astronomers were keeping their instruments and eyes on this space rock to learn more about it, as well as learning more about the early solar system. Even at closest approach, 4179 Toutatis was 7 million km away or 18 times farther than the Moon. But that is close enough for radar imaging by NASA's Goldstone Observatory, which has recently upgraded to a new digital imaging system, as well as optical imaging by other astronomers. Already, there are some preliminary findings from this 4.5-kilometer- long (3-mile-long) asteroid's flyby.

"Toutatis appears to have a complicated internal structure," said team member Michael Busch of the . "Our are consistent with the asteroid's little lobe being ~15% denser than the big lobe; and they indicate 20% to 30% over-dense cores inside the two lobes."

NASA says this raises the interesting possibility that asteroid Toutatis is actually a mash up of smaller . "Toutatis could be re-accumulated debris from an asteroid- in the main belt," Busch said. The new observations will help test this idea.

Here are more images and video from Toutastis' pass:

Adam Block from the Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona captured this footage:

Astronomers are getting to know this asteroid, as it passes by Earth's orbit every 4 years. It is one of the largest known potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), and its orbit is inclined less than half-a-degree from Earth's. No other kilometer-sized PHA moves around the Sun in an orbit so nearly coplanar with our own. This makes it an important target for radar studies.

The team from the Remanzacco Observatory took this 120-second image of Toutatis:

Image from the ITelescope network (Nerpio, Spain) on 2012, Dec. 11.9, through a 0.15-m f/7.3 refractor + CCD. Credit: Ernesto Guido and Nick Howes/ Remanzacco Observatory.

And this was a fairly close pass for Toutatis: The next time Toutatis will approach at least this close to Earth is in November of 2069
when the asteroid will fly by at a distance of only 0.0198 AU (7.7 lunar distances).

NASA's Goldstone radar in the Mojave Desert has been "pinging" the space rock every day starting on December 4, and will continue until the 22nd. The echoes highlight the asteroid's topography and improve the precision with which researchers know the asteroid's orbit.

Additionally, the Chinese Chang'e 2 spacecraft will be observing Toutatis tomorrow, on December 13, 2012 Chang'e 2 was originally launched to study the Moon but after completing its mission, Chang'e 2 departed from the L2 point in April 2012 to align itself to make a flyby of 4179 Toutatis, expected to take place at approximately 08:27 UTC on December 13.

"We already know that Toutatis will not hit Earth for hundreds of years," said Lance Benner of NASA's Near Earth Object Program.. "These new observations will allow us to predict the asteroid's trajectory even farther into the future."

Animation from Ernesto Guido and Nick Howes of 40 consecutive 10-second exposures. Credit: Ernesto Guido and Nick Howes/ Remanzacco Observatory

NASA says the asteroid is already remarkable for the way that it spins. Unlike planets and the vast majority of asteroids, which rotate in an orderly fashion around a single axis, Toutatis travels through space "tumbling like a badly thrown football," as Benner describes it. One of the goals of the radar observations is to learn more about the asteroid's peculiar spin state and how it changes in response to tidal forces from the Sun and Earth.

Here's an animation of Toutatis compiled the live broadcast from the Slooh space camera team:

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.


Explore further: Europe postpones launch of first 'space plane'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

ESO Views of Earth-Approaching Asteroid Toutatis

Sep 29, 2004

Unique Photos from La Silla and Paranal Measure the Distance Today, September 29, 2004, is undisputedly the Day of Toutatis, the famous "doomsday" asteroid. Not since the year 1353 did this impressive "space rock" pas ...

Asteroid 2012 TC4 to buzz Earth on October 12

Oct 12, 2012

Asteroid 2012 TC4 will give Earth a relatively close shave on October 12, 2012, passing at just a quarter of the distance to the orbit of the Moon. Discovered by Pan-STARRS observatory in Hawaii just last ...

NASA in final preparations for Nov. 8 asteroid flyby

Oct 27, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- NASA scientists will be tracking asteroid 2005 YU55 with antennas of the agency's Deep Space Network at Goldstone, Calif., as the space rock safely flies past Earth slightly closer than the ...

NASA radar images asteroid 2007 PA8

Nov 06, 2012

(Phys.org)—Scientists working with NASA's 230-foot-wide (70-meter) Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, Calif., have obtained several radar images depicting near-Earth asteroid 2007 PA8. The images ...

Recommended for you

Asteroid 2014 SC324 zips by Earth Friday afternoon

8 hours ago

What a roller coaster week it's been. If partial eclipses and giant sunspots aren't your thing, how about a close flyby of an Earth-approaching asteroid?  2014 SC324 was discovered on September 30 this ...

Who owns space?

9 hours ago

The golden age of planetary exploration had voyagers navigating new sea routes to uncharted territory. These territories were then claimed in the name of the monarchs who had financed the expeditions. All ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Jeddy_Mctedder
1 / 5 (6) Dec 13, 2012
A truly excellent opportunity still exists to hit this thing with a thermonuclear weapon and see what happens to help us explore how to deal with future threatening asteroids. Tsar bomba we need you!
NOM
5 / 5 (2) Dec 13, 2012
Yeah that's a good idea. Get an asteroid that regularly passes nearby Earth in a predictable orbit and blow it into large chunks. Next time it passes we get to study it really close.
frajo
5 / 5 (1) Dec 15, 2012
More info:
http://news.xinhu...1953.htm .

"Chang'e-2 came as close as 3.2 km from Toutatis and took pictures of the asteroid at a relative velocity of 10.73 km per second ..."