Ailing whale washes ashore at New York City beach

Dec 27, 2012
An emaciated 60-foot finback whale that beached itself in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Rockaways is shown in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012. Biologist Mendy Garron says it's unclear what caused the whale to beach itself, but its chances of survival appear slim. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

(AP)—An ailing, endangered finback whale has been found washed ashore in a coastal enclave of Queens that was hard hit by Superstorm Sandy.

and responded to a report of a 60-foot whale that was stranded on the bay side of the Rockaways. The call came around 10:40 a.m. Wednesday.

A New York State Marine Mammal expert takes a photograph of the head of an emaciated 60-foot finback whale that beached itself in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Rockaways in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012. Biologist Mendy Garron says it's unclear what caused the whale to beach itself, but its chances of survival appear slim. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Mendy Garron says it's unclear what caused the whale to beach itself, but its chances of survival appear slim.

She says the whale isn't moving around much and "looks very compromised."

An emaciated 60-foot finback whale that beached itself in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Rckaways in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012. Biologist Mendy Garron says it's unclear what caused the whale to beach itself, but its chances of survival appear slim. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Garron says biologists are waiting for the tides to subside to determine what to do next.

Breezy Point is still recovering from the October storm that caused serious flooding and a fire that destroyed 100 homes.

Curious onlookers inspect an emaciated 60-foot finback whale that beached itself in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Rockaways in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012. Biologist Mendy Garron says it's unclear what caused the whale to beach itself, but its chances of survival appear slim. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

An emaciated 60-foot finback whale that beached itself in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Rockaways is shown in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012. Biologist Mendy Garron says it's unclear what caused the whale to beach itself, but its chances of survival appear slim. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Bloody abrasions are visible on the sunken head of an emaciated 60-foot, finback whale that beached itself in the Breezy Point section of the Rockaways in New York, Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012. Biologist Mendy Garron says it's unclear what caused the whale to beach itself, but its chances of survival appear slim. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)


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User comments : 3

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Whydening Gyre
1 / 5 (4) Dec 27, 2012
Perhaps it knew that humans might provide assistance?
Lurker2358
5 / 5 (1) Dec 27, 2012
Maybe we could install some sort of sonar devices that could scare whales away from the land, so they don't beach themselves?!
Whydening Gyre
1 / 5 (3) Dec 28, 2012
Maybe we could install some sort of sonar devices that could scare whales away from the land, so they don't beach themselves?!

Maybe - that's what drove him there in the first place...

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