Unexpected data from the Large Hadron Collider suggest the collisions may be producing a new type of matter

Nov 27, 2012 by Anne Trafton
A proton collides with a lead nucleus, sending a shower of particles through the ALICE detector. The ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments also recorded collisions. Credit: Alice/CERN

Collisions between protons and lead ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced surprising behavior in some of the particles created by the collisions. The new observation suggests the collisions may have produced a new type of matter known as color-glass condensate.

When beams of crash into each other at high speeds, the collisions yield hundreds of new particles, most of which fly away from the point at close to the speed of light. However, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) team at the found that in a sample of 2 million lead-, some pairs of particles flew away from each other with their respective directions correlated.

"Somehow they fly at the same direction even though it's not clear how they can communicate their direction with one another. That has surprised many people, including us," says MIT physics professor Gunther Roland, whose group led the analysis of the collision data along with Wei Li, a former MIT postdoc who is now an assistant professor at Rice University.

A paper describing the unexpected findings will appear in an upcoming issue of the journal Physical Review B and is now available on arXiv.

The MIT heavy-ion group, which includes Roland and MIT physics professors Bolek Wyslouch and Wit Busza, saw the same distinctive pattern in proton-proton collisions about two years ago. The same is also seen when ions of lead or other , such as gold and copper, collide with each other.

Those produce a wave of quark gluon plasma, the hot soup of particles that existed for the first few millionths of a second after the Big Bang. In the collider, this wave sweeps some of the resulting particles in the same direction, accounting for the correlation in their flight paths.

It has been theorized that proton-proton collisions may produce a liquid-like wave of gluons, known as color-glass condensate. This dense swarm of gluons may also produce the unusual collision pattern seen in proton-lead collisions, says Raju Venugopalan, a senior scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, who was not involved in the current research.

Venugopalan and his former student Kevin Dusling theorized the existence of color-glass condensate shortly before the particle direction correlation was seen in proton-proton collisions. While protons at normal energy levels consist of three quarks, they tend to gain an accompanying cluster of gluons at higher energy levels. These gluons exist as both particles and waves, and their wave functions can be correlated with each other. This "quantum entanglement" explains how the particles that fly away from the collision can share information such as direction of flight path, Venugopalan says.

The correlation is "a very tiny effect, but it's pointing to something very fundamental about how quarks and are arranged spatially within a proton," he says.

The CMS researchers originally set out to use the lead-proton collisions as a "reference system" for comparison with lead-lead collisions.

"You don't expect quark gluon plasma effects" with lead-proton collisions, Roland says. "It was supposed to be sort of a reference run—a run in which you can study background effects and then subtract them from the effects that you see in lead-lead collisions."

That run lasted only four hours, but in January, the CMS collaboration plans to do several weeks of lead-proton collisions, which should allow them to establish whether the collisions really are producing a liquid, Roland says. This should help narrow down the possible explanations and determine if the effects seen in proton-proton, lead-proton and lead-lead collisions are related.

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Arcbird
1 / 5 (15) Nov 27, 2012
LHC needs to start looking into differentials and harmonnic geometrics...
antialias_physorg
4.2 / 5 (26) Nov 27, 2012
This is just a loud trolling of the layman publics, because the quark gluon plasma has been observed before years at the Tevatron just during lead-lead collisions.

No, this is not trolling because to get a quark-gluon plasma you ned a certain amount of energy. Lead-lead collisions are much more energetic than lead-proton collisions. So finding this here is indeed surprising (and fascinating).
animas
2.3 / 5 (12) Nov 27, 2012
The only thing unexpected was the journalist's exaggerated use of the word "unexpected."

find out the difference between theory and expectation, then I will decide if you are even worthy to report on the scientists' observations.

here is a starting point for your adventure: etymology
joelc_pousson
5 / 5 (11) Nov 27, 2012
As my childhood hero would say...

"Fascinating."
Derk
4.2 / 5 (17) Nov 27, 2012
I think I'm lost on the Internet. I was looking for porn.
mat_helm
3 / 5 (4) Nov 27, 2012
I once got odd readings from a circuit that seemed to be somehow related. Turned out to be my scope....
panorama
4.7 / 5 (12) Nov 27, 2012
I think I'm lost on the Internet. I was looking for porn.

You found it.
Jack_J_Smith
1.6 / 5 (13) Nov 27, 2012
only a matter of time until they open up an unstable worm-hole!
Marquette
5 / 5 (17) Nov 27, 2012
. Lead-lead collisions are much more energetic than lead-proton collisions. So finding this here is indeed surprising (and fascinating)
This is just another nonsense, as the quark gluon plasma has been observed even during pure http://blog.vixra...ns-maybe collisions). Nothing surprising is therefore with the lead-proton collisions.


Why would the lead researcher say this, then?
"You don't expect quark gluon plasma effects" with lead-proton collisions, Roland says. "It was supposed to be sort of a reference run—a run in which you can study background effects and then subtract them from the effects that you see in lead-lead collisions."


He certainly seems to be surprised to find this result. I am curious, do you have a background in nuclear physics, or are you currently doing research? Please educate us as to why they should have expected this. Thank you.
He3
1 / 5 (11) Nov 27, 2012
Since we know that Comets are mostly Olivine; why not blast a simulated solar wind of sodium or calcium against a piece of that mineral and see if we can generate water?
Lurker2358
2 / 5 (29) Nov 27, 2012
Those heavy-ion collisions produce a wave of quark gluon plasma, the hot soup of particles that existed for the first few millionths of a second after the Big Bang.


Anyone find it odd that they continue to cite "theory" as though it were itself a "fact"?

Nobody was there to observe any such thing, so at best it is a hypothesis to assume that "hot soup of particles" is what the universe looked like in the beginning.

But don't let that get in the way of a "good" science article.
Sir_ViP
4.3 / 5 (11) Nov 27, 2012
"only a matter of time until they open up an unstable worm-hole!"

No. Dawkins already assessed that any black holes that the LHC would potentially create would disipate before they could eventually become bigger (they first have to "eat" things with a smaller gravitational pull than themselves in order to get bigger and bigger). And since they're using much less energy than the conditions pre-big bang the black holes that would be created would just be too small to become larger since they would be next to all the comparatively huge machinery that makes the LHC, not to mention that Earth's own gravitational field would cancel out the BH's. That is just one of the many fearmongering myths that is associated with the LHC.

Feel free to correct me on anything I may have gotten wrong.
b_man
1.4 / 5 (18) Nov 27, 2012
These idiots still think there was a Big Bang:) They don't stand a chance of figuring out anything:)
Sir_ViP
4.7 / 5 (9) Nov 27, 2012
@Natello, I agree and disagree with you. I believe that science and journalism are tools. Tools cannot change human nature. Fortunately, as time and history has proven, we mold to social pressures. So what now becomes important is changing society. If we can use the power society can give us, we have the potential to create good. We have the potential to place people in positions in which they can be pressured into maximizing their potential.

So now personally for YOU, I recommend getting rid of the condescending tone that you have, and instead spread the PASSION for science and truth that you so obviously have. I made the same mistake, and I'm slowly learning from it. Passion is what's important. Getting people to be passionate towards science, art, humanity is what's important. It unlocks deeper meaning and experience to life more than anything else.

So let's set up these environments in which people can become impassioned easier, shall we?
dick_lipski_9
1.3 / 5 (14) Nov 27, 2012
It's Bush's fault! OBAMA PHONE!
sophiepaul
1.7 / 5 (6) Nov 27, 2012
Booooommm!!!! New particle causes zombie-like effects on humans.
Mayday
3.8 / 5 (9) Nov 27, 2012
Nutella & friends, so you think that science journalism is ultimately destructive to society? How precious. And I'm sure you really have it in for science-fiction, right? Your titanium tower attitude does leave me just a bit curious however. When you were young, what initially inspired you to the field? Or were you born as a full-fledged scientist?
omatwankr
2.5 / 5 (17) Nov 27, 2012
Replusive Neutron AEither-Way theory is the only theory that relegated surprise to the dust bin of history, for with knowledge of its subtleties anything is possible, I retrodicted just such a Quack-Moron Glass some time ago soon. Yes we the true truth holders are not bound by your pitifully attempts at constraining us with a so called linear time flow.

O'Ranter out!
omatwankr
2 / 5 (10) Nov 27, 2012
"I think I'm lost on the Internet. I was looking for porn."

I like a hot naked singularity as much as the next pervert...

Now I must return to Staring at things until I see the unmistakable signs of the Eelectric Universe, which was created by the great Electric Eel good Teslaogguaulhu (;,;)
sophiepaul
1.6 / 5 (7) Nov 27, 2012
Booooommm!!!! New particle causes zombie-like effects on humans. Stay-Safe guidance.
El_Nose
4.4 / 5 (14) Nov 27, 2012
Since when on a science forum do the commenters have to defend a scientist that was interviewed who said the outcome was unexpected.

Have we stooped so low we don;t believe the quote or we saw that the scientist MUST be wrong.

Let's not be swayed so easily by trolls. And by ignoring them they can disappear back under the bridge.
Q-Star
1.8 / 5 (9) Nov 27, 2012
So eight "new" members join today,,,, the people at NPR should see the authors of this article are available for their next beg-a-ton.
Dancingisraelis
1 / 5 (2) Nov 27, 2012
only a matter of time until they open up an unstable worm-hole!


Unstable wormhole in the middle of Europe is bad. A stable wormhole in the same location is even worse.
Ghost1
1 / 5 (3) Nov 27, 2012
Oops. Last didn't go through. Check out the prophetic GHOSTLIFE quatrain on youtube about this from '08', pretty close parallels in possible D00M! Youtube search 'GHOSTLIFE THE COLLIDER'.
larry_payne_92
1 / 5 (3) Nov 27, 2012
Fascinating. Can this new matter be harvested?
ValeriaT
1.4 / 5 (11) Nov 27, 2012
so you think that science journalism is ultimately destructive to society?
Of course not, but when exaggerated it can be harmful even for evolution of science. The problem is, the weak but systematic negative effects are overlooked with deterministically thinking people systematically. Whole the ignorance of cold fusion or dense aether model is about deterministic bias of science: the ten effects manifesting itself with 60% reliability don't count like single effect which is manifesting itself with 90% reliability, because it cannot be expressed with math so easily. For many physicists the phenomena doesn't exist, until its not modeled mathematically. And vice-versa, at the moment, when physicists have perspective of jobs and salaries in mathematical modeling of phenomena, then this phenomena gets interest into account of theoretically less interesting, but practically often way more important phenomena. It just illustrates the cognitive bias of contemporary science.
_ilbud
5 / 5 (7) Nov 27, 2012
Feel free to correct me on anything I may have gotten wrong.

Dawkins already assessed that any black holes that the LHC would potentially create would disipate before they could eventually become bigger

A) Dissipate
B) Hawking
vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (8) Nov 27, 2012
Collisions between protons and lead ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have produced surprising behavior in some of the particles created by the collisions. The new observation suggests the collisions may have produced a new type of matter known as color-glass condensate.


What which was called as new particles (created by the collisions) seems misinterpreted, actually they are not true particles (something like electrons), and rather they should be called as 'disturbed vacuum fields'! The reason behind is that conventionally, they are coherent states of vacuum fields (this is why they are unstable). To visualize the mechanism which explains how it works, see…
http://www.vacuum...=9〈=en
HarshMistress
4 / 5 (4) Nov 27, 2012
@Sir_ViP: "Tools cannot change human nature."

Many a scientist wouldn't agree with you, from Marx all the way to anthropologists to neurologists.
Trickortreat
1 / 5 (3) Nov 27, 2012
Now by observation this new matter should be hours and days old. But if you register it on data equipments for detecting the age of the atomic matter it will say it is millions of years old already.

Why is that?
Kron
1.5 / 5 (8) Nov 27, 2012
Color-glass condensate is the form regular (baryonic) matter undertakes when travelling at relativistic speeds (close to light speed). The length of the nucleon(s) shortens (Lorentz length contraction), the gluons flatten to produce a kind of a wall. Due to time slowing (time dilation), the liquid type quark gluon plasma which exists within nucleons sort of freezes. In the short term the gluons act as a solid while over a long period they act as a liquid (which is the same with silica, glass).

This new form of matter is just regular matter under relativistic speeds.
Eric_B
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 27, 2012
What happens when the particles collides gangnam style?
LED Guy
5 / 5 (4) Nov 28, 2012
Natello:

The Tevatron only ran proton/anti-proton collisions. It was never designed for lead/lead ion beams.
Silentsam
1 / 5 (4) Nov 28, 2012
Go home LHC. You're drunk!
Jonseer
1 / 5 (3) Nov 28, 2012
Color-glass condensate is the form regular (baryonic) matter undertakes when travelling at relativistic speeds (close to light speed). The length of the nucleon(s) shortens (Lorentz length contraction), the gluons flatten to produce a kind of a wall. Due to time slowing (time dilation), the liquid type quark gluon plasma which exists within nucleons sort of freezes. In the short term the gluons act as a solid while over a long period they act as a liquid (which is the same with silica, glass).

This new form of matter is just regular matter under relativistic speeds.


You know I had a hunch that was the situation :) Actually thanks for the easy to understand explanation.
PlaneWryter
1 / 5 (1) Nov 28, 2012
"Somehow they fly at the same direction even though it's not clear how they can communicate their direction with one another."

Mavens!

Does this remark/finding in ANY fashion suggest the possibility of the notion of the idea that...

...the particles are CHANGING their path's vector...

...causally?

If true, this already incredibly weird universe...just became 10^nth weirder.

What's your interpretation?

Marcusj0015
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2012
NO GOD DAMN IT! it's obviously caused by quantum entanglement.
zaxxon451
1 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2012
perhaps the rover will find signs of life?
IronhorseA
1 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2012
...sensation digging of journalists ...

This is phys.org not the National Enquirer. If the journalist is digging for sensationalism then he's writing for the wrong site. ;P

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