Two sentenced to US prison for copyright piracy

Nov 03, 2012
Two members of an Internet piracy group were sentenced to prison Friday on charges stemming from unauthorized online distribution of first-run films, officials said.

Two members of an Internet piracy group were sentenced to prison Friday on charges stemming from unauthorized online distribution of first-run films, officials said.

The Justice Department said a Virginia court sentenced Willie Lambert, 57, of Pennsylvania, to 30 months in prison and Sean Lovelady, 28, of California to 23 months.

Lambert was ordered to pay $449,514 in restitution and Lovelady $7,500.

Lambert and Lovelady were indicted along with two other defendants in April for their roles in the IMAGiNE Group, a ring that sought to copy and release to the Internet copies of movies only showing in theaters.

The two men each pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy to commit criminal .

According to , Lambert and Lovelady admitted that they went to and secretly used receivers and recording devices to capture the audio sound tracks of copyrighted movies.

The group used software to synchronize the audio file with an illegally obtained video file to create a completed movie for sharing over the Internet.

Two others in the group have pleaded guilty and are awaiting sentencing.

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kochevnik
2.7 / 5 (7) Nov 03, 2012
Everything is a crime in USA. Even going home with a woman after a single drink is now rape. What a joyless place for the 99%

What the police state fails to understand that if everything is a crime, everyone becomes a career criminal. There is no more inhibition against grevious real rapes and murder because prision is the result in any case. Criminals are now motivated to push their agenda to the extreme without concern for others because there is little added penalty for outright murder sprees, wanton raping and crime careers. Indeed the prisoners get free housing and healthcare while minimum wage earners toil with their health precariously leaning over the edge of bankrupcy. Jail time is nothing for the career criminal it is part of the profession.
ethicalfan
1.7 / 5 (6) Nov 03, 2012
The real question is why Willie Lambert gets prosecuted and Verizon & AT&T who do 1000 times more damage every day than these guys did are getting away scot free. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics says that musicians wages are down 45% since p2p technology arrived. US Home video sales (DVD, BluRay, PayTV, VOD, Streaming) are down 25% to $18.5B in 2011 from $25B in 2006.
The first BitTorrent search engines debuted in 2004. Recorded music is down worldwide from $27B in 1999 (Napster) to $15B in 2011. Video Game revenue is down 13% from 2007. In the meantime broadband revenues grew from zero to $50B a year in the US with p2p as the killer app that drove broadband adoption. Those are real jobs lost that are not coming back until the public realizes that these are your friends and neighbors whose careers are being destroyed by lack of copyright enforcement. Who is destroying these industries? ISPs who ignore the law 17 USC 512 (i) and do not terminate repeat infringers.
kochevnik
4 / 5 (8) Nov 04, 2012
Only about 1% of album proceeds go to the artist. The record companies swindle artists in ways that no amount of pirating could ever hope to achieve. Moreover people who bootleg also buy more albums, and put more $ directly in the pockets of artists where it belongs. Record companies are dinosaurs which survive past their expiration date only by legislating sleazy contracts to death.
antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (4) Nov 04, 2012
Everything is a crime in USA.

Gotta feed those prisons. Prisons are booming - but they only make money if they are full. Can you imagine how much political and financial leverage an 'industry' has that keeps nearly 2.5 million people under lock and key? (That's 0.75% of the whole population!)

From wikipedia:
"General US population grew 2.8 times in the same period (1920-2006). The number of inmates increased more than 20 times."

"At year-end 2007 the United States had less than 5% of the world's population and 23.4% of the world's prison and jail population (adult inmates)."

Though, to be fair, that's due to mostly prison sentences being far longer in the US than elsewhere.

But as a percentage of the population it's very close to the Gualg system in the USSR in the 1940s (there it was 800 in 100000 in prison. In the US it's currently 743 in 100000)
Deathclock
1 / 5 (1) Nov 04, 2012
The US Bureau of Labor Statistics says that musicians wages are down 45% since p2p technology arrived. US Home video sales (DVD, BluRay, PayTV, VOD, Streaming) are down 25% to $18.5B in 2011 from $25B in 2006.
The first BitTorrent search engines debuted in 2004. Recorded music is down worldwide from $27B in 1999 (Napster) to $15B in 2011. Video Game revenue is down 13% from 2007. In the meantime broadband revenues grew from zero to $50B a year in the US with p2p as the killer app that drove broadband adoption. Those are real jobs lost that are not coming back until the public realizes that these are your friends and neighbors whose careers are being destroyed by lack of copyright enforcement. Who is destroying these industries? ISPs who ignore the law 17 USC 512 (i) and do not terminate repeat infringers.


Adapt or die, change your business model when technology antiquates it.
christ_jan
not rated yet Nov 04, 2012
I have the feeling americans dont know what justice means. Maybe they should study more about the french revolution.

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