Qeexo screentouch experience puts knuckles and nails to work (w/ video)

Nov 17, 2012 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org)—Touchscreen computing as an "experience" has only just begun. Working on ideas they seeded at Carnegie Mellon, computer-human interaction researchers have started a San Jose, California, company Qeexo, that features technology called FingerSense. With FingerSense, the computer user can perform tasks with more than just the finger's tips, expanding the use of the finger over to using knuckles and nails. Each part of the finger can order up different tasks, such as managing e-mail content, managing objects in computer games and rubbing-in features when sketching a face. They have managed to expand the concept of fingerpad as the sole interface that can be used on the touchscreen.

They are showing the world expanded finger options. Tomorrow's may think nothing, for example, of knocking twice with a knuckle to bring up a new page.

The company website is thin on technical details; little is said how it is done under the hood, but their video offers an impressive appreciation of what is done. When , for example, the user knocks coconuts with knuckles, squashes berries with fingerpads, and slices bananas with nails. But how does Qeexo's technology enable the computer to differentiate between fingertip, nail, or knuckle on a ? Their FingerSense technology involves an acoustic sensor that is small enough to fit inside a and can capture made by various touches. This can pick up on different "sounds."

Chris Harrison, Julia Schwarz, and Scott Hudson, authors at Carnegie Mellon of a paper on finger interaction on Touch Surfaces, noted back in 2011 how "humans use different parts of their fingers in different ways – to scratch an itch, type on a keyboard, tap a co-worker on the shoulder, or knock on a door." They thought about this and how, with careful design, these norms could be leveraged "such that existing finger behaviors could be ported to and made relevant in digital domains."

At a time when direct-touch interfaces are around in everyday life, from mall store kiosks, to tablets and smartphones, it is not difficult to understand that Qeexo is upbeat about its future. Qeexo was spun off from Carnegie Mellon University this year and there is both an office in San Jose and also a R&D team in Pittsburgh. According to reports, they are talking to phone manufacturers, and they hope to see FingerSense in smartphones within a year.

Explore further: Increasing ecological understanding with virtual worlds and augmented reality

More information: chrisharrison.net/projects/tapsense/tapsense.pdf
www.qeexo.com/

Related Stories

Microsoft puts finger on 1ms touchscreen (w/ video)

Mar 13, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Touchscreen features in smartphones and tablets are satisfying perks in going wireless and mouse-less in mobile computing, but now Microsoft wants to make people aware of how much more satisfying ...

Recommended for you

Startup marries digital, physical worlds

18 hours ago

A startup business that wants to link the realm of physical objects to the digital world of the Internet is basing its future on low-cost, highly engineered, one-of-a-kind plastic stamps.

Ears, grips and fists take on mobile phone user ID

Apr 26, 2015

A research project has been under way to explore a biometric authentication system dubbed Bodyprint, with interesting test results. Bodyprint has been designed to detect users' biometric features using the ...

Zensors: Making sense with live question feeds

Apr 23, 2015

Getting answers to what you really want to ask, beyond if the door is open or shut, could be rather easy. A video on YouTube demonstrates something called Zensors. Started at Carnegie Mellon last year and ...

User comments : 6

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

NeutronicallyRepulsive
1 / 5 (1) Nov 17, 2012
I love how they always include drawing capability. Nobody actually does that (more than maybe once). Otherwise why not, but no big deal.
DonaldJLucas
2.3 / 5 (4) Nov 18, 2012
This is probably the next big thing, but I do wonder what happens on the day that you cut your nails? Also, I wonder if they have made adequate consideration that old people like to buy things too, but usually have arthritic knuckles!
Skepticus
3.5 / 5 (6) Nov 18, 2012
If all commands fail, direct all five knuckles at the screen at high speed.
powerup1
not rated yet Dec 02, 2012
If all commands fail, direct all five knuckles at the screen at high speed.


Unless you have some really unusual hands, you contact with only 4 of your knuckles when you punch. ;-)
powerup1
1 / 5 (1) Dec 02, 2012
If all commands fail, direct all five knuckles at the screen at high speed.


Unless you have some really unusual hands, you contact with only 4 of your knuckles when you punch. The knuckle of the thumb being perpendicular to the other knuckles of the hand when you form a fist. ;-)
DonaldJLucas
not rated yet Dec 03, 2012
Thanks for bringing a smile to my face today ;-)

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.