Pope to join celebs, presidents with Twitter feed

Nov 08, 2012
In this Oct. 24,2012 file photo, Pope Benedict XVI blesses the faithful in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican for his weekly general audience. The Vatican spokesman on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012 said that the 85-year-old Benedict will start tweeting from a personal Twitter account, perhaps before the end of the year. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini, File)

(AP)—He already has a billion followers. Now, Pope Benedict XVI will join the Twitter-sphere, tweeting from a personal account along with the world's celebrities, leaders and ordinary folk.

Vatican spokesman the Rev. Federico Lombardi made the announcement Thursday, saying details about Benedict's handle and other information will come when the Vatican officially launches the account, perhaps before the end of the year.

The 85-year-old Benedict sent his first tweet from a Vatican account last year when he launched the Vatican's news information portal, aimed at the world's 1.1 billion Catholics. The new Twitter account will be his own, though it's doubtful Benedict himself will wrestle down his encyclicals, apostolic exhortations and other papal pronouncements into 140-character bites.

Benedict, who writes longhand and doesn't normally use a computer, will more likely sign off on written in his name.

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defactoseven
1 / 5 (1) Nov 09, 2012
Why muddy our pristine Internet communication sphere with Pope speak?
Shinobiwan Kenobi
1 / 5 (2) Nov 09, 2012
The Pope, world leaders, and celebrities ARE regular folk.

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