Physicists theorize entangled quantum batteries could be almost perfect

Nov 09, 2012 by Bob Yirka report

(Phys.org)—Theoretical physicists Robert Alicki and Mark Fannes of the University of Gdansk and the University of Leuven respectively, have uploaded a paper to the preprint server arXiv where they theorize that it should be possible to build an almost perfect entangled quantum battery. They suggest that as the number of entangled batteries increases, their overall performance approaches the thermodynamic limit.

The teams' ideas are based on work that has shown that some possess some amount of energy while others do not, i.e. those in a passive state. The difference between the two is considered to be extractable work. In their paper the two show that under normal circumstances, the work extracted from such a system isn't perfect, but when is considered, things can be improved. They suggest that if a were made that was also entangled, more work could be extracted from the system as more of the entangled batteries are added to the system. Such work could theoretically be extracted instantly, because of the properties of entanglement, which they say, would mean that as more batteries are added, the closer the whole system would come to being a perfect battery, i.e. one that doesn't lose any energy when it's transferred.

Their theory is not without its flaws, the pair acknowledge, the main one being that no one knows how to build such a battery using current technology. Another is that even if there were a way, the practicalities of building a real battery would likely introduce inefficiencies into the system, removing its perfection.

On the other hand, as some have noted, nature seems to have found a away to overcome the problem of building such a battery as, biologists have shown that the process of photosynthesis achieves perfect , though nobody has been able to explain how.

If ever an entangled quantum battery were made with nearly perfect energy transfer, it could be used to power atomic or even subatomic devices, or perhaps more practically, allow for the creation of batteries that are far superior to those used in everyday applications such as lithium-ion battery packs.

Explore further: Controlling light on a chip at the single-photon level

More information: Extractable work from ensembles of quantum batteries. Entanglement helps, arXiv:1211.1209 [quant-ph] arxiv.org/abs/1211.1209

Abstract
Motivated by the recent interest in thermodynamics of micro- and mesoscopic quantum systems we study the maximal amount of work that can be reversibly extracted from a quantum system used to store temporarily energy. Guided by the notion of passivity of a quantum state we show that entangling unitary controls extract in general more work than independent ones. In the limit of large number of copies one can reach the thermodynamical bound given by the variational principle for free energy.

via Arxiv Blog

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User comments : 11

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antialias_physorg
not rated yet Nov 09, 2012
"Entangled quantum batteries". I'd fund that one just for the cool terminology.

Anyone knows what a typical energy density in such a battery where number of batteries increases to the point where it's almost optimal would be (which would be between 20 and 40 if I read their paper correctly)? I.e. what the 'thermodynamical bound' is?
Donutz
3 / 5 (1) Nov 09, 2012
It's not clear from the article whether the battery is entangled internally, or whether two or more separate batteries are entangled. If the latter, you could end up with a power transmission scheme where you pump energy into a stationary battery and the mobile mate in your car makes use of the power. Holy science-fiction, batman!
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (2) Nov 09, 2012
Holy science-fiction, batman!

Batman uses 'atomic batteries'. Very old school.

It's not clear from the article whether the battery is entangled internally, or whether two or more separate batteries are entangled.

From their paper:
"As we are dealing with small quantum systems we may
wonder whether using processes that entangle two iden-
tical copies of a given battery can yield a higher energy
extraction."

So it seems it's several batteries that are entangled. I.e. each battery can deliver a given energy value - but when you couple (entangle) two of them it's more than two times the energy of one battery.

If the latter, you could end up with a power transmission scheme where you pump energy into a stationary battery and the mobile mate in your car makes use of the power.

Not really, as these two separate systems would not be entangled.
Tektrix
5 / 5 (3) Nov 09, 2012
Entanglement and coupling are not exactly the same thing. Coupling implies that two independent systems are somehow joined together and are exchanging work. Entanglement means that all members of an ensemble are required to fully describe the expected outcomes of the system (which are probabilistic.) For entangled quantum batteries, the probabilities for electron transfer improve as the properties are shared between more and more cohorts. In essence, as you add batteries, the system gets more and more robust, from a probability standpoint. Eventually, you reach a point where the probabilities of electron transfer overcome conventional (or in the words of the paper, 'independent') battery losses.
Quarky1
3 / 5 (2) Nov 09, 2012
Why not go all Douglas Adams and build an Improbability Battery or a Bistro Battery? Cool!
grondilu
1 / 5 (1) Nov 10, 2012
I was wondering why charging a nano-suit took so much time in minecraft. I guess that's 'cause there is no quantum-battery mod yet.
vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (3) Nov 10, 2012
(Phys.org)—Theoretical physicists Robert Alicki… theorize that it should be possible to build an almost perfect entangled quantum battery. … their overall performance approaches the thermodynamic limit.
If ever an entangled quantum battery were made with nearly perfect energy transfer… allow for the creation of batteries that are far superior to those used in everyday applications such as lithium-ion battery packs.

This is amazing, unfortunately nowadays it seems that we still do not understand whether the entanglement is really happen or not, and if it is true then how does it work! Knowing the mechanism of quantum mechanics below may help the quantum battery idea.
http://www.vacuum...19〈=en
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Nov 10, 2012
Electrons in metals are entangled and these batteries really do work with high efficiency. What next?
Otto_Krog
1.8 / 5 (5) Nov 11, 2012
Quantum Mechanics is very spooky. That's for sure. Quantum mechanics has for many years been used in new age to "prove" the existence of esp, paranormal activity, telepathy etc. ad infinitum, but those ideas are getting closer and closer to a scientific bluestamp.

I have been a fan of Sir Roger Penrose of Oxford University for many years. He was the first scientist to say that consciousness should be found in the quantum field rather than in the brain. I am so much a fan, that I made my own theory out of the idea that consciousness might be explained through a better understanding of antimatter and parallel universes.

My idea is that antimatter is the mirror of this universe, and that antimatter might be where memory is located.

I think that the subconscious mind and consciousness are located in parallel universes in the form of antimatter. That makes the spirit and maybe even God all physical, so basically I could be said to be an atheist, even though I consider myself spiritual.
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (2) Nov 11, 2012
I have been a fan of Sir Roger Penrose of Oxford University for many years. He was the first scientist to say that consciousness should be found in the quantum field rather than in the brain. I am so much a fan, that I made my own theory out of the idea that consciousness might be explained through a better understanding of antimatter and parallel universes.

Why has the comments section of this site become so much of a sink for cranks and crazies?
Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2012
I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics. - RF
Is there safer haven for cranks and crazies where no one is understood?

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