Orangutan's chemotherapy treatment for cancer ends

Nov 13, 2012

(AP)—The medical team for an 8-year-old orangutan with cancer in Miami says she no longer needs to undergo chemotherapy.

Peanut, one of the star attractions at Jungle Island, had been undergoing chemotherapy since August after being diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Her doctors said Tuesday that they decided to stop treatments after three courses of combination -immunotherapy. The team says it's confident Peanut received "an adequate course of therapy" because the disease was detected early on.

Her doctors say imaging is not available to show how effective the treatment was in an . But staff veterinarian Dr. Jason Chatfield says that without , Peanut would not have survived.

The team will be closely monitoring Peanut. She and her twin, Pumpkin, will celebrate their birthday on Dec. 2.

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