NASA sees Tropical Depression Nilam blanket southern India

Nov 01, 2012
The MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone Nilam over southern India on Nov. 1 at 05:50 UTC (1:50 a.m. EDT). Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

After Tropical Cyclone Nilam made landfall in southeastern India NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead and saw the storm's clouds blanket the entire southern portion of the country from Chennai southward.

On Nov. 1 at 05:50 UTC (1:50 a.m. EDT), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's captured a of Tropical Depression Nilam.

The MODIS image showed that Nilam's clouds stretched as far north as Andra Pradesh, a state in east central India. It covered the states of Goa and Karnataka in the west, all the way down to the states of Tamil Nadu, Puducherry and Kerala in extreme southern India.

On Oct. 31 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT/8:30 p.m. local time, India), Nilam made over southeastern India and started to elongate. When a system is no longer circular and starts to elongate, it begins to weaken.

India's Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre (RSMC) issued a bulletin on Nilam on Nov. 1 at 2 a.m. EDT (11:30 a.m. local time/India). At that time, Nilam was centered over Rayalaseema. Rayalaseema is a geographic region in the state of Andhra Pradesh. The RSMC noted that Nilam is expected to move northwestward and weaken to a remnant low pressure area later on Nov. 1.

The RSMC expects heavy rainfall over Rayalaseema, Karnataka and south coastal Andhra Pradesh and north Tamilnadu on Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 before the storm dissipates.

Explore further: The tsunami-early warning system for the Indian Ocean – ten years later

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Scientists make strides in tsunami warning

38 minutes ago

The 2004 tsunami led to greater global cooperation and improved techniques for detecting waves that could reach faraway shores, even though scientists still cannot predict when an earthquake will strike.

Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans

1 hour ago

Long-term observations indicate that the oxygen minimum zones in the tropical oceans have expanded in recent decades. The reason is still unknown. Now scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.