NASA images reveal how Hurricane Sandy changed coastline in New Jersey

November 9, 2012 by Mike Carlowicz
Photo of the New Jersey coastal town of Mantoloking, just north of where Hurricane Sandy made landfall, taken on October 31, 2012 shows the damages caused by Hurricane Sandy. Credit: Aerial photography courtesy of the NOAA Remote Sensing Division.

(Phys.org)—On October 29, 2012, lives were changed forever along the shores of New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and in the two dozen United States affected by what meteorologists are calling Superstorm Sandy. The landscape of the East Coast was also changed, though no geologist would ever use the word "forever" when referring to the shape of a barrier island.

Two show a portion of the New Jersey coastal town of Mantoloking, just north of where Hurricane Sandy made . Both photographs were taken by the Remote Sensing Division of the (NOAA). The after image on October 31, 2012; the before image was acquired by the same group on March 18, 2007. The images were acquired from an altitude of roughly 7,500 feet, using a Trimble Digital .

Photo of the New Jersey coastal town of Mantoloking taken on March 18, 2007 Credit: Aerial photography courtesy of the NOAA Remote Sensing Division.

The Mantoloking Bridge cost roughly $25 million when it was opened in 2005 to replace a bridge built in 1938. After Sandy passed through on October 29, 2012, the bridge was covered in water, sand, and debris from houses; county officials closed it because they considered it unstable.

On the barrier island, entire blocks of houses along Route 35 (also called Ocean Boulevard) were damaged or completely washed away by the storm surge and wind. Fires raged in the town from natural gas lines that had ruptured and ignited. A new inlet was cut across the island, connected the Atlantic Ocean and the Jones Tide Pond.

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cantdrive85
2 / 5 (3) Nov 09, 2012
I guess Sandy wanted to make sure MTV didn't resurrect 'The Situation' and Snooki.
zinger
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 10, 2012
Unbelievable people build their houses on sandbars and have their insurance subsidized at taxpayer expense. I have no pity for these people, they chose to build a house where common sense should had told them not to so they should have to shoulder the burden and expense of living their.
aristotles
not rated yet Nov 10, 2012
Unbelievable people build their houses on sandbars and have their insurance subsidized at taxpayer expense. I have no pity for these people, they chose to build a house where common sense should had told them not to so they should have to shoulder the burden and expense of living their.

Agreed. I recall a Sunday school song from my childhood that went something like this: "Don't build your house on the sandy land, don't build it too near the shore. Well, it may look kind of nice but you'll have to build it twice, you'll have to build your house once more."

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