Music in our ears: The science of timbre

Nov 01, 2012

New research, published in PLOS Computational Biology, offers insight into the neural underpinnings of musical timbre. Mounya Elhilali, of Johns Hopkins University and colleagues have used mathematical models based on experiments in both animals and humans to accurately predict sound source recognition and perceptual timbre judgments by human listeners.

A major contributor to our ability to analyze music and recognize instruments is the concept known as 'timbre'. Timbre is a hard-to-quantify concept loosely defined as everything in music that isn't duration, loudness or pitch. For instance, timbre comes into play when we are able to instantly decide whether a sound is coming from a violin or a piano.

The researchers at The John Hopkins University set out to develop a that would simulate how the brain works when it receives auditory signals, how it looks for specific features and whether something is there that allows the brain to discern these different qualities.

The authors devised a computer model to accurately mimic how specific transform sounds into the that allow us to recognize the type of sounds we are listening to. The model was able to correctly identify which instrument was playing (out of a total of 13 instruments) to an of 98.7 percent.

The model mirrored how human listeners make judgment calls regarding timbre. The researchers asked 20 people to listen to two sounds played by different musical instruments. The listeners were then asked to rate how similar the sounds seemed. A violin and a cello are perceived as closer to each other than a violin and a flute. The researchers also found that wind and percussive instruments tend to overall be the most different from each other, followed by strings and percussions, then strings and winds. These subtle judgments of timbre quality were also reproduced by the computer model.

"There is much to be learned from how the human brain processes complex information such as musical timbre and translating this knowledge into improved computer systems and hearing technologies", Elhilali said.

Explore further: Professor quantifies how 'one thing leads to another'

More information: Patil K, Pressnitzer D, Shamma S, Elhilali M (2012) Music in Our Ears: The Biological Bases of Musical Timbre Perception. PLoS Comput Biol 8(11):e1002759. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002759

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Tausch
1 / 5 (1) Nov 04, 2012
Kudos.
Why stop there?
Go molecular.
Vary the brain specific estrogen levels.
Obviously classifier(s) for a molecular machine vector support model must be found.

http://phys.org/n...483.html

The processing of the acoustic signal in the cochlea is modeled as a bank of 128 constant-Q asymmetric bandpass filters equally spaced on the logarithmic frequency scale spanning 5.3 octaves. The cochlear output is then transduced into inner hair cells potentials via a high pass and low pass operation.
Further...
Unlike a simple Fourier analysis of the signal, the cochlear filtering stage operated on a logarithmic axis with highly asymmetric filters.