US, Mexico ink deal to curb stolen mobile phone use

Nov 13, 2012
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Julius Genachowski speaks in April 2012. US and Mexican officials signed a bilateral agreement on Tuesday aimed at blocking the cross-border use of stolen mobile telephones.

US and Mexican officials signed a bilateral agreement on Tuesday aimed at blocking the cross-border use of stolen mobile telephones.

The US and Mexico's Secretariat of Communications announced the plan to share databases of stolen phones in both countries to prevent reactivation.

"Today's announcement cracks down on the growing trend of stolen mobile devices," Julius Genachowski said.

"US and Mexican collaboration to block reactivation of stolen mobile devices in both countries sends a clear message to thieves and —this is a crime that does not pay."

Officials say that in Washington, New York and other large US cities, roughly 40 percent of all robberies now involve cell phones, with smartphones like the iPhone a particularly tempting target for thieves.

Some stolen devices in the US appear to be resold in Latin American markets, including Mexico.

The move comes two weeks after US began implementing a system this week to block the reuse of stolen mobile phones by sharing data on thefts.

Genachowski signed the agreement in Washington with Mexican Communications Under-Secretary Hector Olavarria Tapia.

US and Mexican mobile providers also recently announced their participation in the international stolen device database, which is used to identify and deactivate a stolen device after it has been reported.

US wireless providers have been able to access the database for information about stolen devices in each country since October 31.

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User comments : 2

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CrooklynBoy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 13, 2012
Our government 'snaps' into action....so competent...
chromosome2
not rated yet Nov 14, 2012
So, we're going cashless, stolen phones can be prevented from being used on cell networks.. cannabis is legalized in two states.. car keys have transceivers.. seems like a bad time to be in crime, organized or not.