A new study shows men who feel 'love' for their beer brand will purchase significantly more than a regular consumer

Nov 27, 2012
A new study shows men who feel 'love' for their beer brand will purchase significantly more than a regular consumer

(Phys.org)—A new study has found that men who feel 'love' for their beer brand purchase 38 per cent more beer than average, while women who feel 'bonding' with their laundry detergent brand purchase 60 per cent more than the average customer.

These are some of the findings from a study on 'emotional branding' by Murdoch University's Audience Labs and the University of Wollongong.

According to Dr Steve Bellman, Deputy Director of Audience Labs, emotional branding is becoming widely used globally – including MacDonald's 'I'm loving it' campaign and Kodak's attempts to link its brand to .

However, its effectiveness has been virtually unknown up until now.

"Our study shows that when companies tap into consumer's deeper feelings, the payoffs can be substantial," Dr Bellman said.

"Emotionally attached consumers purchase substantially more than regular customers, which frees companies from having to rely on promotions and discounts to keep them buying the brand.

"On the flip side, however, while advertisers are eager to create emotional attachments between consumers and their goods, we've found forming these deep feelings can be a difficult task."

Researchers found full-strength occurred in only about 25 per cent of buyers – less in the case of utilitarian products like petrol and .

Dr Bellman said emotional branding did occur with utilitarian products and that emotional branding was a better predictor of purchasing behaviour than the more traditional measurement of 'brand attitude' (customers rating a brand as simply good or bad).

"Our findings on utilitarian products were surprising, as we don't usually associate petrol and laundry detergent with emotions like companionship and love," Dr Bellman said.

"But obviously some people feel very strongly about pulling up to the pumps."

The study involved 1,025 people and saw participants rate brands purchased over the past 12 months in product categories involving utilitarian and 'hedonic' products (such as instant coffee and beer).

These ratings were then compared with amounts purchased and attachment emotions, if any, felt for each brand.

Emotions included trust, bonding ('It's my brand'), resonance ('This fits my self image'), companionship ('This brand is like a companion to me') and love, in which a deep affection was felt and the consumer would be really upset if they couldn't have their brand.

Dr Bellman said the study showed emotional branding to be just as effective among men as among women.

'Emotional Branding Pays Off' by John Rossiter and Steve Bellman was published in the Journal of Advertising Research (September 2012).

Explore further: Parents benefit from Head Start program, pattern especially strong in African-Americans

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The message in advertising is irrelevant, new research shows

Dec 04, 2006

Creativity and emotion are what makes advertising successful, not the message it is trying to get over, new research shows. Dr Robert Heath, from the University of Bath’s School of Management, found that advertisements ...

A 'brand' new world: Attachment runs thicker than money

Nov 04, 2010

Can you forge an emotional bond with a brand so strong that, if forced to buy a competitor's product, you suffer separation anxiety? According to a new study from the USC Marshall School of Business, the answer is yes. In ...

Recommended for you

Gypsies and travellers on the English Green Belt

Oct 17, 2014

The battle between Gypsies, Travellers and the settled community over how land can be used has moved to the Green Belt, observes Peter Kabachnik of the City University of New York.

Cadavers beat computers for learning anatomy

Oct 16, 2014

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications ...

Mongolian women 'want status over big families'

Oct 16, 2014

A new study suggests the aspirations of women in Mongolia have rapidly shifted. Before the rapid economic transition of the 1990s, the wealthiest women in the Communist-style era had big families. However, ...

User comments : 0