Israel dig uncovers 8,500-year-old well

November 8, 2012
Israeli archaeologists have uncovered a well dating back to the Neolithic period some 8,500 years ago, adding that two skeletal remains were found inside.

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered a well dating back to the Neolithic period some 8,500 years ago, Israel's Antiquities Authority said on Thursday, adding that two skeletal remains were found inside.

The well, discovered in the Jezreel Valley in the northern Galilee region, contained a variety of , as well as the remains of a woman approximately 19 years old, and an older man, the IAA said.

said it was unclear how the pair came to be in the well, but hailed the discovery of the ancient water source.

"Wells from this period are unique finds in the archaeology of Israel and probably also in the prehistoric world in general," said Omri Barzilai, head of the authority's prehistory branch.

He said one other well of a similar age had already been discovered in Israel.

"The exposure of these wells makes an important contribution to the study of man's culture and economy in a period when pottery vessels and metallic objects had still not yet been invented," he added.

Yotam Tepper, excavation director for the IAA, said numerous artefacts were recovered from inside the well, including sickle blades and arrow heads.

"The impressive well that was revealed was connected to an ancient farming settlement," he said.

Tepper added that the well demonstrated "the impressive quarrying ability of the site's ancient inhabitants and the extensive knowledge they possessed regarding the local hydrology and geology, which enabled them to quarry the limestone bedrock down to the level of the ."

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