New CMOS image sensor created with on-circuit color noise reduction lowers pixel noise and improves image quality

Nov 29, 2012

Toshiba America Electronic Components announced a new 13 mega pixel, 1.12 micrometer, CMOS image sensor delivering high-image quality equivalent to a 1.4 micrometer pixel image sensor. Toshiba implemented back side illumination (BSI) technology and integrated color noise reduction (CNR) to develop its newest CMOS image sensor that fits into an 8.5mm x 8.5mm size camera module and enables high-quality pictures even in low-light conditions.

"As mobile devices like smartphones and tablets get smaller and thinner, the pixel size of image sensors needs to shrink accordingly," said Andrew Burt, vice president of the Analog and Imaging Business Unit, Group at TAEC. "However, the miniaturization of pixel size reduces the amount of light entering into the pixel which impacts image quality. Toshiba addresses the challenge of pixel miniaturization with its newest CMOS image sensor."

The miniaturization of pixel size impacts performance of and (SNR) in today's 1.12 pixel image sensors. BSI technology helps improve sensitivity, but falls short on elevating image quality. Leveraging its innovation and technology expertise, Toshiba developed its newest CMOS image sensor with BSI and CNR integrated on the sensor to address both low-light sensitivity and SNR. As a result, the Toshiba CMOS image sensor provides approximately 1 ½ times higher SNR value than a 1.12 micrometer pixel image sensor with no CNR feature allowing manufacturers to deliver products with high-quality imagery, even in low-light conditions.

Samples of the Toshiba 13 mega pixel, 1.12 micrometer CMOS image sensor, part number T4K37, will be available in December 2012 . Sample pricing begins at $ 20.00 (U.S.). For more information go to: www.toshiba.com/taec/adinfo/cmos/

Explore further: Renesas announces SRAM using leading-edge 16 nm FinFET for automotive information systems

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KBK
1 / 5 (2) Dec 15, 2012
Now, take this technology..and make it full size, as in 35mm DSLR, and give me high pixel density high frame rate low light condition capacity. It might end up being like... about a gen II night vision system, but with detail, color fidelity, and frame rate.

The security business (at the least, may others, as well) would go ape over such a device.

Flipping nickels at cell phone perfection, does seem like such a huge waste of this, to me.

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