Australia beaches reopen after red algal bloom

Nov 30, 2012
A swimmer heads towards a red algae bloom at Sydney's Clovelly Beach on November 27, 2012. Beaches around southeastern Australia's coastline reopened on November 30 after the bloom that glowed a phosphorescent blue at night forced them to close to the public.

Beaches around southeastern Australia's coastline reopened after a red algal bloom that glowed a phosphorescent blue at night forced them to close to the public.

The algae, noctiluca scintillans, forced swimmers and surfers out of the water at Sydney's Bondi and a number of neighbouring beaches earlier this week, and it spread along the fringes of two states.

One of the worst affected beaches, Clovelly in Sydney, reopened Friday, just in time for a predicted over the weekend.

"There is no sign of the red algal bloom that kept the beach closed from Tuesday to Thursday this week," the local council said, a sentiment echoed by other councils along the city's northern beaches.

"It is now safe to swim, at the moment," a Surf Life Saving NSW official told reporters.

"We'll continue to monitor the situation."

Aerial footage shot over parts of and neighbouring Victoria state showed huge blooms of the oily red to pink scum this week, which has a fishy and can irritate the skin and eyes but is not dangerous to humans.

One of the most striking features was the way it glowed blue at night, earning it the nickname "sea sparkle".

The Sydney South Coast and Hunter Regional Algal Coordinating Committees said the blooms typically occur as a result of currents bringing cold, nutrient-rich water to the surface.

Explore further: Researchers develop new instrument to monitor atmospheric mercury

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Algae turns Australian oceans milky pink

Nov 29, 2012

A huge red algal bloom along vast stretches of southeastern Australia's coastline Thursday resulted in beaches being closed and turned swathes of usually pristine ocean milky pink.

Harmful 'red tide' hits Dubai beaches

Apr 07, 2009

Beaches in the Gulf tourism hub of Dubai have been plagued by a bloom of algae known as the "red tide" that has killed fish and is potentially harmful to humans, a municipality official said on Tuesday.

Spanish resort in jellyfish alert

May 27, 2011

Authorities in the Spanish tourist hotspot of Benidorm said Friday they have reopened its beaches to tourists after removing more than a tonne of dangerous jellyfish.

Huge sperm whale washes up on Sydney beach

Apr 28, 2011

A dead 10-metre (32-feet) sperm whale has washed up on a Sydney beach, with rescuers struggling Thursday to remove it as the animal's blood runs into the water, attracting sharks.

Recommended for you

Arsenic stubbornly taints many US wells, say new reports

Jan 30, 2015

Naturally occurring arsenic in private wells threatens people in many U.S. states and parts of Canada, according to a package of a dozen scientific papers to be published next week. The studies, focused mainly ...

Who's been affected by Australia's extreme heat? Everyone

Jan 30, 2015

Australia has been hit by two years of heat: 2013 was the hottest ever recorded and 2014 wasn't far behind, taking third place. The country has also sweltered through several significant heatwaves, and, though ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.