AT&T to expand wireless, wired broadband reach

November 7, 2012 by Peter Svensson

AT&T says it will expand the reach of its U-Verse wired high-speed broadband service and its "4G LTE" wireless broadband network beyond previous plans.

AT&T says it had considered selling off its phone lines in outlying areas, but instead it will expand investments in U-Verse in core areas and try to move customers in outlying areas from copper phone lines to services.

Like other companies, AT&T is having a hard time competing with cable companies in home in places where it offers only non-U-verse DSL services. U-Verse is expensive to build out, but puts AT&T on a more equal footing with cable speeds.

U-Verse is available to 24.5 million homes. AT&T says it will expand it to 33 million.

Explore further: In race with cable, AT&T pushes discounted bundle

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