New approach allows past data to be used to improve future climate projections

Nov 29, 2012

Climate scientists are still grappling with one of the main questions of modern times: how high will global temperatures rise if the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide doubles. Many researchers are turning to the past because it holds clues to how nature reacted to climate change before the anthropogenic impact. The divergent results of this research, however, have made it difficult to make precise predictions about the impact of increased carbon dioxide on future warming. An international team of scientists have evaluated previously published estimates and assigned them consistent categories and terminology. This process should assist in limiting the range of estimates and make it easier to compare data from past climate changes and projections about future warming. The group has presented its new method in the current edition of the journal Nature.

The research group summarized, classified and compared data from more than 20 studies to make a potential prognosis about the expected future rise in the world's temperature. In these palaeoclimate studies has been reconstructed on the basis of data derived from ice and . Climate sensitivity is a key parameter in the study of . It describes the rise of the mean temperature of the earth's surface due to changes in the . Specifically, its value represents the increase in calculated by , if the carbon dioxide content in the atmosphere doubles. Here, models were initialised with pre-industrial .

The team was then faced with the challenge of comparing the assembled studies. Each study spoke of "climate sensitivity", but not all took the same factors into account. "We had to elaborate all the different assumptions and uncertainties, such as which studies look exclusively at carbon dioxide and which considered other greenhouse gases such as or the effect of reflection, the so called albedo, from ice surfaces. Only then could we compare the data. We also calculated the climate sensitivity data if we only considered like carbon dioxide or added in albedo", explained Dr Peter Köhler, one of the article's main authors and climatologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, part of the Helmholtz Association.

The research group was able to use its new method to differentiate ten different kinds of climate sensitivity. In a second phase of the project, they then worked on devising consistent terminology and concrete definitions. The new classification system should prevent future researchers from publishing widely divergent estimates of climate sensitivity based on differing assumptions. "Ideally, it should be clear from the start of a study what kind of climate sensitivity is being addressed. The factors considered by the researchers to be driving temperature change should be clear from the language used. Our terminology offers a conceptual framework to calculate climate sensitivity based on past climate data. We hope that this will improve evaluation of future climate projections", adds Köhler.

This work represents a significant advance for climatology. It is the first summary of what scientists have been able to reconstruct about climate sensitivity based on data from the past 65 million years and the assumptions that were behind the data. It also demonstrates that the climate forecasts in the IPCC reports agreed with the estimates of how nature has reacted to changes in the climate through the course of the earth's history.

The research team has not, however, achieved one of its goals. "We had hoped to limit the range of current assumptions about climate sensitivity. In its last report, the IPCC summarised that the global temperature would rise 2.1 to 4.4 degrees C if the atmospheric carbon dioxide level rises to double the pre-industrial values. As it turns out, our climate sensitivity values are currently within this same range" says Dr Köhler.

Further open questions will have to be addressed in order to obtain more precise figures. Scientists know, for example, that climate sensitivity depends on the predominant background climate at the time, i.e. whether climate is in an ice age or a warm age. But exactly how this background climate impacts climate sensitivity still has to be answered. The climatologists behind this study hope that the new conceptual framework will push further research in this direction.

The article is the outcome of a three-day colloquium held last year at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam, attended by more than 30 specialists in the field.

Explore further: Researchers question emergency water treatment guidelines

More information: "Making sense of palaeoclimate sensitivity" appeared in the 29 November issue of Nature. (doi: 10.1038/nature11574), Vol 491, pages 683-691.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sensitive side

May 05, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- A little extra carbon dioxide in the air may, unfortunately, go further towards warming Earth than previously thought. A team of British and U.S. researchers have uncovered evidence [1] that ...

Explained: Climate sensitivity

Mar 19, 2010

Climate sensitivity is the term used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to express the relationship between the human-caused emissions that add to the Earth's greenhouse effect -- carbon ...

Recommended for you

Researchers question emergency water treatment guidelines

13 hours ago

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) recommendations for treating water after a natural disaster or other emergencies call for more chlorine bleach than is necessary to kill disease-causing pathogens ...

European climate at the +2 C global warming threshold

15 hours ago

A global warming of 2 C relative to pre-industrial climate has been considered as a threshold which society should endeavor to remain below, in order to limit the dangerous effects of anthropogenic climate change.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

philip_haddad_37
1 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2012
Using data before humans impacted the climate is good, but the data show that heat caused the rise in CO2, not vice versa. Study the data carefully and you will see that temperature rose because more solar heat was absorbed due to shifts in earth's orbit. (Malenkovich cycles). Temperature and CO2 rose together but temperature fell first and faster than CO2, showing that CO2 did not support the higher temperature. To use these data to determine a "climate sensitivity" to CO2 is bogus, but that is the basis for models which are being used to predict future temperatures. The models will be correct only if the fossil fuel mix remains the same. It is the heat of combustion that is causing rising temperatures, not the CO2 per se. When fossil fuels are eliminated both CO2 and heat will be removed. But if nuclear power is our energy source we will have the heat without the benefits of CO2. Nuclear power adds twice the total heat as its electrical output. CO2 removes energy by photosynthesis.

More news stories

Melting during cooling period

(Phys.org) —A University of Maine research team says stratification of the North Atlantic Ocean contributed to summer warming and glacial melting in Scotland during the period recognized for abrupt cooling ...