Americans love (and hate) their mobile phones: survey

Nov 30, 2012
A man speaks on his cell phone on a subway platform in New York in 2011. Americans both love and hate their mobile phones, according to a new survey.

Americans love them, and hate them. And many say they can't imagine living without their mobile phones.

A survey released Friday shows the mixed emotions people feel about their devices, with many saying they use the phones to save time, but worry about spending too much time using them.

The Pew Internet Project survey found that 67 percent of cell owners find themselves checking their phone for messages, alerts, or calls, even when they don't notice their phone ringing or vibrating.

It found 44 percent have slept with their phone next to their bed because they wanted to make sure they did not miss important calls or messages, and 29 percent of cell owners describe their phone as "something they can't imagine living without."

Yet many in the survey also reported the of being constantly available: 11 percent of owners said they worry that they are spending too much time with their phone, and 12 percent said people they know tell them that they are spending too much time using their phone.

Additionally, 39 percent of those with mobile phones said they have received complaints because they fail to respond promptly to calls or messages.

The survey found 65 percent of cell owners say that their phone has made it a lot easier to stay in touch with the people they care about but nine percent said using the phones makes it harder to disconnect from work life.

The survey found some 15 percent of adults do not own a at all, mostly because they feel they don't need one. Just one in five non-adopters say that cost is the main reason.

It found 40 percent of who own a cell phone have not yet upgraded to a , with economics being a major factor for one-third of those.

Explore further: Hand out money with my mobile? I think I'm ready

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User comments : 6

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dschlink
not rated yet Nov 30, 2012
I don't consider going to a smartphone an upgrade. It's a transformational process to a radically different device. Haven't bothered, because I don't need anything extra that a smartphone offers.
kochevnik
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2012
I'm blowing off smartphones because they're tomorrow's dinosaurs. I need a desktop PC on my wrist. Anything short of that is just a waste of money and time. The alternative is a huge bandwidth bill employing VNC or such back remote software to my desktop.
extinct
1 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2012
cellphone workmanship and quality of materials are such that if you don't upgrade at least annually, you feel like you're behind. psy-ops, no doubt. could I live without it? sure. land lines are making a comeback
Readero
not rated yet Dec 01, 2012
Agree with "kochevnik". But, there are some devices which were built to be computers first, and cellular phones second - I am speaking about Internet Tablets from Nokia; the last of the line has cellular connectivity.
"extinct", I have a small question: since cellular chip and antenna are apparently quite small, is it possible to wire them through RJ11 telephone connector to an ancient "land line telephone" and carry it in the backpack like a cellular phone - without all these fancy operating systems and fragile screens?
Gigel
not rated yet Dec 01, 2012
I hate phones. And alarms.
Andrea_Kha
not rated yet Jan 15, 2013
Mobile Survey (Txt2survey) module of TxtImpact mobile marketing platform; brands, agencies, small businesses, and mobile advertisers can obtain immediate feedback on a certain event or action from your customers.
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