World 'not on track' for temperature target: UN

Oct 18, 2012
Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, gives a press conference at the end of a UN climate conference in Bonn, western Germany, on May 25, 2012. Governments are "not on track" to achieve a target of keeping the average global temperature rise below two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), Figueres said Thursday.

Governments are "not on track" to achieve a target of keeping the average global temperature rise below two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), the UN climate chief said Thursday.

Christiana Figueres, executive secretary of the (UNFCCC), told a forum in Singapore that the world was moving in the right direction, but not fast enough.

"Even if governments were to comply with all the mitigation pledges that are on the table, it will still only provide 60 percent of the effort that is necessary to keep global rise to under two degrees," she said.

"It is also well known that governments have agreed to review this target to 1.5 degrees should the science demand more drastic action. Frankly... we are not on track."

World leaders agreed in December 2009 to the Copenhagen Accord, which introduced a plan to cap the rise in temperatures to below two degrees to stave off the worst .

"We are clearly moving toward a low-carbon economy. What we're not doing is we're not moving with the speed and at the scale that the science demands," Figueres said.

Her predecessor Yvo de Boer said in March that the target was already out of reach. It was set by a core group of countries in the final stormy hours at the Copenhagen Summit and became enshrined at Cancun, Mexico a year later.

More and more scientists are warning that the objective is slipping away without radical, early cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions.

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Claudius
1.5 / 5 (8) Oct 18, 2012
""We are clearly moving toward a low-carbon economy. What we're not doing is we're not moving with the speed and at the scale that the science demands," Figueres said."

Translation: Carbon taxation is not progressing fast enough.

chromosome2
3 / 5 (5) Oct 19, 2012
We've built our cities and our lifestyles around fossil fuels.. People regularly live 10 miles away from their job and then complain that walking, bikes, or velomobiles aren't "practical", when the reality is that they live in impractical places. All of our kitchens are designed for upright refrigerators whose cold air falls right out when opened. We've got roads without bike lanes all over the place. Grains and legumes provide a complete protein, but who would think to put them in a sandwich? Apartments and condos cut down heating and cooling waste, but it's the *house* that's the American Dream. The house with three kids in it. The amount of culture change necessary is *extreme*, and the dedication necessary for a modern human being to achieve it on an individual basis exceeds the requirements of casual adherence to most religions.
yaco8
3 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2012
Well, what is the surprise? 'Chromosome2' above is very right, we must change the blueprints. But its 2012 and most of us remain ignorant of the most basic sustainability principles. My babyboomer dad just bought my babyboomer mum a new car for her birthday. Helloo..??
VendicarD
3.3 / 5 (3) Oct 19, 2012
What makes me laugh is that there isn't even a movement to alter home construction layouts so that by community code, they must provide for efficient building upgrades to solar heating and power generation.