Well-ordered nanorods could improve LED displays

Oct 25, 2012

Scientists have utilized the imaging capabilities of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) to help develop enhanced light-emitting diode displays using bottom-up engineering methods.

Collaborative work between researchers from the University of Florida and CHESS has resulted in a novel way to make colloidal "superparticles" from oriented nanorods of . The work was published in the journal Science, Oct. 19.

The team synthesized nanorods with a and shell. Taking advantage of the compounds' lattice mismatch interfaces, they assembled these rods into larger periodic colloidal structures, called superparticles.

The superparticles exhibit enhanced light emission and polarization, features that are important for fabrication of LED televisions and computer screens. The nucleated superparticles can further be cast into macroscopic polarized films. The films could increase efficiency in polarized LED television and computer screen by as much as 50 percent, the researchers say.

The team, which included CHESS scientist Zhongwu Wang, made use of the CHESS facility to collect small angle X-ray scattering data from specimens inside tiny diamond-anvil cells. They used this technique, in combination with high-resolution , to analyze how nanorods with attached could be formed into well-ordered structures.

The nanorods first align within a layer as hexagonally ordered arrays. Then the highly ordered nanorod arrays behave like a series of layered units, self-assembling into structures that exhibit long-range order as they grow into large superparticles. The elongated superparticles can be aligned in a into macroscopic films.

The project demonstrates how scientists are learning to recognize and exploit anisotropic interactions between nanorods, which can be adjusted during the synthesis process, to create single-domain, needle-like particles. The authors hope their work can lead to new processes of self-assembly to create nano-objects with other anisotropic shapes, perhaps even joining two or more types of objects to form well-defined mesoscopic and macroscopic architectures with greater and greater complexity.

Explore further: Solving molybdenum disulfide's 'thin' problem

Related Stories

Recommended for you

3-D images of tiny objects down to 25 nanometres

16 hours ago

Scientists at the Paul Scherrer Institute and ETH Zurich (Switzerland) have created 3D images of tiny objects showing details down to 25 nanometres. In addition to the shape, the scientists determined how ...

Solving molybdenum disulfide's 'thin' problem

Mar 27, 2015

The promising new material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has an inherent issue that's steeped in irony. The material's greatest asset—its monolayer thickness—is also its biggest challenge.

Snowflakes become square with a little help from graphene

Mar 25, 2015

The breakthrough findings, reported in the journal Nature, allow better understanding of the counterintuitive behaviour of water at the molecular scale and are important for development of more efficient techno ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.