Strict anti-piracy laws come into force in Japan

Oct 01, 2012

Controversial laws punishing Internet users who download pirated files with fines or jail terms came into force in Japan on Monday.

Under the they could face up to two years in prison or a maximum of two million yen ($25,700) in fines.

The revision follows a lobbying campaign by Japan's for measures to curb piracy, but critics and local media have expressed concern.

They say the change in the law allows authorities to target any Internet user and could be open to abuse.

However, advocates say charges can be only be filed against alleged violators if copyright holders lodge a .

Before the revision, the law punished only those who uploaded unauthorised music and videos, with penalties of up to 10 years in prison or a fine of up to 10 million yen.

When the new law was passed in June, websites of the Japanese , the Supreme Court and other public offices were defaced or brought down in apparent protest at the change.

The following month about 80 masked people, calling themselves allies of the global hacker activist group Anonymous, picked up litter in Tokyo in a novel protest against the tightened laws.

They were dressed in black and wore masks of Guy Fawkes, the central figure in England's 1605 Gunpowder Plot to blow up parliament, which have become a symbol of protests by the loosely linked alliance around the world.

Explore further: Fitbit to Schumer: We don't sell personal data

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Innovation trumped by copyright law

Sep 10, 2012

(Phys.org)—From Napster to iTunes to Pandora, the methods by which the public can obtain and share music have rapidly progressed.

New Russia internet law deemed censorship by critics

Jul 30, 2012

A new law seeking to protect minors from internet sites with harmful content comes into force in Russia on Monday amid criticism that it is a veiled move to increase censorship in the country.

Wikipedia in Italian reopens after media law protest

Oct 07, 2011

Internet database Wikipedia restored access to its pages in Italian on Thursday following a protest over a law being debated in parliament that would have legally obliged websites to correct any content if ...

Recommended for you

US warns shops to watch for customer data hacking

7 hours ago

The US Department of Homeland Security on Friday warned businesses to watch for hackers targeting customer data with malicious computer code like that used against retail giant Target.

Fitbit to Schumer: We don't sell personal data

22 hours ago

The maker of a popular line of wearable fitness-tracking devices says it has never sold personal data to advertisers, contrary to concerns raised by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer.

Should you be worried about paid editors on Wikipedia?

Aug 22, 2014

Whether you trust it or ignore it, Wikipedia is one of the most popular websites in the world and accessed by millions of people every day. So would you trust it any more (or even less) if you knew people ...

How much do we really know about privacy on Facebook?

Aug 22, 2014

The recent furore about the Facebook Messenger app has unearthed an interesting question: how far are we willing to allow our privacy to be pushed for our social connections? In the case of the Facebook ...

Philippines makes arrests in online extortion ring

Aug 22, 2014

Philippine police have arrested eight suspected members of an online syndicate accused of blackmailing more than 1,000 Hong Kong and Singapore residents after luring them into exposing themselves in front of webcam, an official ...

Google to help boost Greece's tourism industry

Aug 21, 2014

Internet giant Google will offer management courses to 3,000 tourism businesses on the island of Crete as part of an initiative to promote the sector in Greece, industry union Sete said on Thursday.

User comments : 0