How will smart cars affect the future of driving?

Oct 05, 2012

California, Nevada, and Florida have already made driverless cars street-legal, and continuing advances in the technology have led many to predict that the commercialization of automated vehicles is a real possibility in the not-so-distant future. As driverless vehicles become more commonplace, it is important to understand how humans interact with this new technology. The Human Factors special issue on automation, featuring the latest articles on designing automated vehicles with the driver in mind, is now available online.

The October 2012 issue may be found at http://hfs.sagepub.com/content/current.

"With an almost exponential increase in the development of new technologies for and support in vehicles, the topic of this special issue seemed very appropriate," said Guest Editor Natasha Merat. "The issue brings together research results on the effect of automation in vehicles on and and provides a valuable collection of papers from North America and Europe outlining the most recent research in the area."

The research in this issue represents a range of topics, including in-vehicle warning systems, driver-system interaction, user experience, and drivers' willingness to accept and trust smart cars. The following is a sampling of articles included in the special issue.

  • "Fatigue and Voluntary Utilization of Automation in Simulated Driving"
  • "Driving With a Partially Autonomous Forward Collision : How Do Drivers React?"
  • "Sharing Control With Haptics: Seamless Driver Support From Manual to Automatic Control"
  • "Trust in Smart Systems: Sharing Driving Goals and Giving Information to Increase Trustworthiness and Acceptability of Smart Systems in Cars"
"Rapidly developing will likely change driving more in the next five years than it has changed in the previous fifty, and understanding how drivers will respond to these changes is critical," said Guest Editor John D. Lee. "This special issue offers the first collection of papers on highly automated vehicles with a focus on how technology will affect drivers and provides a view into the future of driving."

Explore further: The delivery drones are coming, so rules and safety standards will be needed – fast

Related Stories

Google gets driverless car law passed in Nevada

Jun 24, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- The savvy among you may remember that back in May we told you about Google's attempts to get the Nevada state legislature to consider allowing users to driver UGV, or unmanned ground vehic ...

BMW shows hands-free driving on Autobahn (w/ video)

Jan 24, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Move over, Google, or better still, stay off the Autobahn, best not to interfere with the main show, which now stars BMW and its technology feats with self-driving cars. BMW has been drawing ...

Recommended for you

Cost-effective production of magnetic sensors

6 hours ago

They are found wherever other measurement methods fail: magnetic sensors. They defy harsh environmental conditions and also function in fluids. A new procedure is now revolutionizing the production of two-dimensional ...

Measurement of components in 3D under water

6 hours ago

Conveying systems for oil and gas, operated in the sea have many important underwater components. The maintenance of such components is elaborate and expensive, as measuring them is complicated. Fraunhofer ...

Plastic parts for internal combustion engines

7 hours ago

Efforts to produce lighter vehicles necessarily include engine parts, such as the cylinder casing, which could shed up to 20 percent of its weight if it were made of fiber-reinforced plastic rather than aluminum ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.