Skydiver begins prep for supersonic jump: Watch it live

October 9, 2012 by Jeri Clausing
In this July 25, 2012 photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, a balloon lifts up during the second manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. It's described as a "40-acre dry cleaner bag," that, when first filled, will stretch 55 stories high. On Monday, this special ultra-thin helium balloon is scheduled to liftoff from Roswell, N.M., to carry "Fearless Felix" Baumgartner 23 miles into the stratosphere for what he hopes will be a history-making, sound barrier-breaking skydive. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos)

A weather hold that threatened to cancel extreme athlete and skydiver Felix Baumgartner's death-defying, 23-mile free fall into the southeastern New Mexico desert has been lifted.

The planned 7 a.m. launch Tuesday was delayed by high winds. But just before 9 a.m., the winds calmed and the team decided to proceed with plans to begin the launch, a process that would take about two hours.

Crews began laying out his balloon.

In this Thursday, March 15, 2012 photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Felix Baumgartner prepares to jump during the first manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos over Roswell, N.M. On Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 over New Mexico, Baumgartner will attempt to jump higher and faster in a free fall than anyone ever before and become the first skydiver to break the sound barrier. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Jay Nemeth)

The 43-year-old former military parachutist from Austria plans to take off in a 55-story, ultra-thin and easy-to-tear that will take him into the stratosphere for a jump.

He hopes it will make him the first skydiver to break the and shatter three other world records.

Watch it live:

Explore further: Skydiver Fearless Felix jumps from 18 miles up


Related Stories

Skydiver aims for supersonic plunge on Oct. 8

September 25, 2012

(AP)—The countdown is on for skydiver Felix Baumgartner. In just two weeks, the Austrian parachutist will attempt to go supersonic when he jumps from a record altitude of 23 miles (37 kilometers) over the U.S.

Skydiver eyes record-breaking jump over NM

October 8, 2012

Experienced skydiver and extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner hopes to take the leap of his life on Tuesday, attempting the highest, fastest free fall in history.

Skydiver's supersonic jump on weather hold (Update)

October 9, 2012

(AP)—Plans for extreme athlete and skydiver Felix Baumgartner to make a death-defying, 23-mile (37-kilometer) free fall into the southeastern New Mexico desert were on hold Tuesday morning due to winds, but his team was ...

Recommended for you

Getting into the flow on the International Space Station

December 1, 2015

Think about underground water and gas as they filter through porous materials like soil and rock beds. On Earth, gravity forces water and gas to separate as they flow through the ground, cleaning the water and storing it ...

Exiled exoplanet likely kicked out of star's neighborhood

December 1, 2015

A planet discovered last year sitting at an unusually large distance from its star - 16 times farther than Pluto is from the sun - may have been kicked out of its birthplace close to the star in a process similar to what ...

Cassini mission provides insight into Saturn

December 1, 2015

Scientists have found the first direct evidence for explosive releases of energy in Saturn's magnetic bubble using data from the Cassini spacecraft, a joint mission between NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian ...

Timing a sextuple quasar

December 1, 2015

Quasars are galaxies with massive black holes at their cores around which vast amounts of energy are being radiated. Indeed, so much light is emitted that the nucleus of a quasar is much brighter than the rest of the entire ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.