Skydiver eyes record-breaking jump over NM

Oct 08, 2012 by Jeri Clausing
In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria, sits in his trailer during the preparations for the final manned flight of the Red Bull Stratos mission in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)

Experienced skydiver and extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner hopes to take the leap of his life on Tuesday, attempting the highest, fastest free fall in history.

In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria, stands in his trailer during the preparation for the final manned flight of Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)

If he falls fast enough, the man dubbed "Fearless Felix" could be the first skydiver to break the . His high-risk jump will be live-streamed on the Internet for the world to see.

Rigged with cameras, the 43-year-old former military parachutist from Austria is scheduled to jump from a balloon-hoisted capsule 23 miles above southeastern New Mexico near Roswell.

In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria,sits in his capsule during the preparation for the final manned flight of Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)

But whether he and his capsule get off the ground depends on the weather. A breeze over 2 mph is too risky for the huge, but delicate balloon carrying him to the . The project is sponsored by energy drink maker Red Bull.

In a photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria, sits in his capsule during the preparations for the final manned flight of the Red Bull Stratos mission in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Red Bull Stratos announced Friday that the jump by extreme athlete Baumgartner have been moved from Monday to Tuesday, Oct. 9, due to a cold front with gusty winds. The jump can only be made if winds on the ground are under 2 mph for the initial launch a balloon carrying Baumgartner. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Joerg Mitter)


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