Scholar exposes environmental efforts of big brands as 'token' efforts

October 10, 2012

(—A study by a scholar at The University of Queensland reveals that the 'green revolution' advertised by the world's biggest brands and corporations is misleading consumers.

Dr Guy Pearse, who conducted the study, is a research fellow at the UQ Global Change Institute.

"Going green is the 'new black' for big business, yet there is a big divide between the climate-friendly revolution that's being advertised and what's required to reduce ," Dr Pearse said.

"Toyota reckons drives a , Ford wants us to 'Join the Green Revolution' and McDonald's has painted its famous golden arches green. Yet, the '' is not happening in the way the world's corporations would have us believe," he said.

The findings from Dr Pearse's study are launched in a new book, Greenwash.

Director of the Global Change Institute Director, Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg said the research concluded that the necessary transition to a low-carbon economy was not happening fast enough, based on credible, scientific evidence, to have much effect on the problem of rapid anthropogenic global climate change.

"While one has to admire the attempt by many of our top corporations to deal with the problem of rapidly rising emissions of greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels, Greenwash challenges the notion that the private sector will lead us into a low-carbon future," Professor Hoegh-Guldberg said.

"This is an extremely urgent problem that needs more than a token effort. Citizens need to strongly articulate the future they want for themselves and their children," he said.

"Thankfully, some companies are 'walking the talk' and, in doing so, they are meeting the challenge of climate change. What's alarming is that there are few global brands among them.

"The outcome from this study serves as an important wake-up call for corporations to re-examine their efforts to deal with the planet-threatening problem of change."

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not rated yet Oct 10, 2012
I thought everyone knew this.

In our current economic environment, it isn't in the budget if it costs more than the current process, reducing emissions costs more.

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